Reclaiming Glass with Stencils

I really didn’t know what to title this post, so I thought about it overnight and still didn’t come up with anything, lol. In the end, it just made sense to state exactly what we did – reclaimed used glass with stencils.

My husband found this solid oak, Amish-made gun cabinet on the local Swap and Sell facebook page. We took a drive to check it out and he decided he had to have it. The biggest issue was the sandblasted etching on the glass. The door itself was built around the glass, so we would need a woodworker to replace it, but my husband didn’t want to weaken the integrity of the door. That left us with the option of altering the glass while still in the door frame.

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We put some scrap vinyl over a letter to see how badly it would show through, and then a second layer. The sandblasted texture definitely would show through both layers. I knew that acid etching wouldn’t match the texture, so that was out. It was time to get creative.

I measured the area that had been etched, and created it in Make-the-Cut. Then we tried out different shapes to cover it, until he found the one he liked best. I cut the stencil out of 24″ wide vinyl on the roll using a slow speed. I covered the stencil with transfer paper to pick up the thin border and then I used application fluid to give me some time to adjust/move the vinyl around to get it positioned perfectly. After two tries applying the vinyl to the door, we decided to trim it down to just a few inches all the way around because it was just too hard to handle 24″ of vinyl.

Once the stencil was in position, and we had squeegeed the water and bubbles out, we masked the area using freezer paper – one of my favorite multipurpose craft supplies.

stencils

At this point, I had to decide if I was going to use acid etch to make the glass hold the paint securely or try something else. In the end, since it was a very large area and I don’t have a lot of acid etch on hand, we decided to use an universal bonding primer (it boasts that it bonds to ANY surface – let’s hope that’s accurate).

Universal Bonding Primer

Universal Bonding Primer

After the primer had dried completely, we added a stone coat paint. This was how we were going to hide the sandblasted letters within the stencil area. On top of the stone coat, I also added a Matte Finish Coat. Then, the big REVEAL!

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There was some water under the vinyl in the upper left hand corner, and it had watered down the primer there. Once it dried completely, I placed small strips of vinyl over the clear glass and touched it up.

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Now that the previous owner’s etched ‘sign’ is covered, hubby just has to decide what he wants to put on it. 😉

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air 24″):

  • f = 28
  • v = 150
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Measure the area to be stenciled
  2. Create or find a pattern that will cover the area
  3. Cut the vinyl
  4. Apply the vinyl and mask
  5. Paint according to directions
  6. Peel away the mask and vinyl

 

 

 

Memorial Day Table Topper (Free File)

Hoorah! I am ahead of the game, FOR ONCE! I have been saving bottles for a year, with many project ideas swarming around in my head. There are many different ways to decorate and use glass bottles and jars – and they don’t even have to be Mason jars – lol. For the upcoming season, I wanted to make some table toppers for our family get-togethers. For both Memorial Day and the 4th of July, these will be perfect!

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I filled this bottle with red ‘straw’ gift packaging material, but there are endless possibilities to add more dimension to the decoration.

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air + contact paper):

  • f = 21
  • v = 350
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Clean the bottle thoroughly and allow to dry.
  2. Apply glass etch cream and set for 10 minutes.
  3. Remove glass etch cream, wash thoroughly and allow to dry.
  4. Open or create the stencil file. Cut stencils from wall vinyl or contact paper.
  5. Use transfer tape to pick up all of the pieces of the stencil.
  6. Apply stencil to glass bottle/jar.
  7. Using the airbrush system, apply Copic marker colors where desired.
  8. Allow to dry and decorate.

One of my favorite things about this method is that the glass etch process makes the glass ‘cloudy’ but the Copic markers make it very shiny and transparent again. It gives the glass project a wonderful contrast.

Memorial Day Decoration

I have some leftover glass blocks from Christmas projects, and I can’t wait to get started on the next phase of the decorations – which I will fill with white lights! I plan to have a decorated bottle on each of the tables for our Memorial Day gathering. Then I will use the lighted glass blocks for around the patio.

Memorial Day decorations

 

Stencil Magic – Guest Post

Last week, I worked with a customer on pixel tracing to create a stencil project. The final outcome was absolutely phenomenal and I asked if I could share it with you here on Team KNK, and I’m so glad she agreed.

Deb creates personalized, unique and beautiful designs in Make-the-Cut for decorative signs using her KNK Zing. Here is one example:

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She uses stencil material; either a 6 mil mylar for one-time use or a 16 mil stencil material for multi-use.

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Materials:

Settings (KNK Zing):

  • Speed = 13/13
  • Force = 154
  • Passes = 2
  • Blade Height = 9 Post-it Notes

Steps:

  1. Pixel trace the design in Make-the-Cut or create from scratch
  2. Use layers to separate each color for one stencil
  3. Cut the stencil material
  4. Apply temporary adhesive and press to substrate
  5. Cover any areas outside of the stencil that may inadvertently get sprayed
  6. Paint each layer and allow to dry between colors

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And look how stunning this is!!!!

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I want one! lol

Using Cut Files as Masks & Stencils

Hello fellow KnK-ers!

In my last post I demonstrated how I use cut files for embossing and I thought I’d look at another use for cut files today so I will show how cut files can be used for masking or stenciling.

You can use a large patterned panel such as these designs as a one-piece stencil to spray or ink through to create a great background for your peojects. Today though I will use smaller pieces to build up a scene and as Halloween is fast approaching I will create a spooky graveyard picture for the front of my card. The cut file is available at the end of this post 🙂

These are the Materials I used:

  • My wonderful KnK Zing
  • Make the Cut Software
  • Copic Markers & a Copic Airbrush set (sponging with ink works great too)

These are the Zing Settings I used:

  • Blade = Standard
  • Blade Height = 25 post-it notes
  • Offset = 0.30
  • Speed = 10
  • Force =  80
  • Passes = 1

Pic 1. I cut the pieces I will use as masks (the pieces which will protect my card and keep it white underneath) from some paper and added temporary adhesive on the back of them:

Halloween Scene 1

Pic 2. I cut my stencil pieces ensuring that there was plenty of paper around them to protect my card from over-spray (or over-sponging). I added temporary adhesive to the back of these too:

Halloween Scene 2

Pic 3. I placed my masking pieces, except for the clouds, onto my card front:

Halloween Scene 3

Pic 4. I placed the first cloud piece at the bottom of my card and sprayed along the top edge and slightly upwards with a light purple marker. You could also use ink sprays or your regular ink pads and a sponge to achieve similar results:

Halloween Scene 4

Pic 5: I continued to spray the clouds with 4 different colours of purple gradually getting darker towards the top alternating the 2 cloud pieces as I went:

Halloween Scene 5

Pic 6. Now the the masking is done we can do the stenciling, I placed the graveyard stencil piece at the bottom of my card and sprayed with a dark grey marker:

Halloween Scene 6

Pic 7. As I wanted my bats to look like they are flying in front of the moon I needed to remove my moon mask before I stenciled my bats, I used a black marker this time:

Halloween Scene 7

Pic 8. Once all of your masking/stenciling is done you have the fun of peeling any remaining masks from your card to reveal the bright white card underneath. I added the cloud pieces back over my moon and gave it a subtle cloudy look with a pale lilac marker:

Halloween Scene 8

Pic 9. To complete my card I backed my Halloween scene with some black card. I cut my sentiment from some more black card and adhered it to a strip of vellum which I wrapped around my scene panel and stuck to the back of it with tape. I then popped my panel onto a purple card base with 3d foam pads:

Halloween Scene 9

If you would like to see more projects I have created with my Zing, access my Free Cut Files and read my Terms of Use, you can find my blog here: www.birdscards.com

Here is today’s Cut File:

Halloween Scene by Bird

Halloween Scene Cut File by Bird