New Mommy – New Daddy: an Iron-on and Rhinestone Project

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Today I’m posting two shirts decorated by one of our Team KNK designers, Omayra! What a fun gift idea for couple expecting their first baby! The rhinestone additions to the new mommy shirt is also a great way to get your feet wet with rhinestones. I know a lot of KNK owners are hesitant to try rhinestones, so just like with other first time applications, it’s important to start with something easy and then work your way up to more complicated tasks.

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So, on with the details…

Ingredients for this project:

T-Shirts
Iron-on transfer
Rhinestones
Rhinestone Rock-it template material OR Rhinestone Motif Rubber
Rhinestone transfer tape
Shur-line Trim and Touchup Pad
Home iron or Heat Press

Instructions for iron-on application:

(1) Design the lettering in the software of your choice. Omayra used either KNK Studio or Make The Cut. Both will work great.
(2) Mirror the letter!!! This is the number one mistake made by those new to iron-on projects. Because you flip the material over (dull side up) and cut only through the adhesive and iron-on layer, you need to mirror your shapes.
(3) Use a 45 degree (red capped blade) and set your blade length to only cut through the top layer. The bottom shiny layer is the heat protection layer that will be on top when you iron or heat press the material to the shirt.
(4) Use a relatively lower force. Iron-on materials do not cut as easily as regular wall or decal vinyl, however, they do not require the high force needed for most cardstock. The older Maxx and Groove-e need a force of about 60 while the KNK Zing and Maxx Air need a setting of about 30. Remember to do small test cuts first to make sure the cut is clean, weeds easy from the protective backing layer and isn’t cutting into that layer.
(5) Use 1 pass and a speed of about 200 mm/sec.
(6) After cutting, weed out the excess leaving just the shapes you want to press onto the shirt.
(7) Pre-heat your home iron to a cotton setting or about 330F (165C) on a heat press. Press your shirt first for a few seconds to remove any wrinkles and moisture from the material.
(8) Arrange your design carefully. If using a home iron, you may wish to press one part at a time.
(9) Press for about 10 seconds. Allow to cool before removing protective top sheet. You may wish to put a soft cloth over the top and press for another 5 seconds.

Instructions for rhinestone application:
(1) Design the rhinestone pattern in the software of your choice. There are free videos and tutorials teaching how to design and edit rhinestone patterns in both KNK Studio and Make The Cut. Remember that you need to make the circles larger than the actual stone size so that the stones easily brush into the holes. For 10SS (3 mm) stones, the circles should be ~ 3.4 – 3.6 mm in diameter.
(2) For cutting, remove the backing sheet and brayer the material to your sticky mat. This will great aid the weeding of the circles after cutting.
(3) Refer to KNK user manuals for the recommended cut settings for either the Rock-it or the green motif rubber. Remember to use 2 passes and, if cutting from KNK Studio, turn off Overcut so that the blade stays down during the two passes. And don’t forget to do a test cut of a small section of your rhinestone pattern. Then make sure that when you peel up the template material, the circles stay stuck to the mat.
(4) Watch this video on weeding and brushing in the stones, and lifting with the transfer tape: Cutting a rhinestone template on the Maxx. The same basic procedure is used with these recommended template materials listed in the ingredients above. Note that you do not need a backing for the Rock-it material since it has a repositionable adhesive applied.
(5) Follow the same instructions for applying to the shirt as with the iron-on, however press for a full 15 seconds. After cooling, remove the clear transfer sheet.

As always, if you have questions, let me know! And be sure to share your FABULOUS iron-on and rhinestone successes with us at our Klic-N-Kut Yahoo group or KNK USA forum!

Winter Wonderland Card – 5 KNK Applications!

FIVE KNK Zing applications for making ONE card… it was not intentional! 😛 It was just one of those things that happened as I designed this card for my friend Marty’s Winter Wonderland swap. It was on my to do list to try cutting and ironing fabric onto a card at some point. And with the theme being what it was, I knew there would need to be some glue and some glitter! But the rest was just stuff that happened as I went about designing this project. In the end, the five KNK Zing applications were:

  • Cutting the snowman, tree, and hat from fabric
  • Drawing snowflakes with a Quickie glue pen using the Zing
  • Cutting double-sided adhesive to create the snow bank
  • Cutting the tree trunk and snowman arms from wood paper
  • Cutting a rhinestone template for the snowman’s other features


  • Ingredients for this card:

    KNK Zing
    Silvery gray cardstock from Recollections
    Light blue and green patterned cotton fabric
    Black cotton fabric
    Thermo-web Heat n Bond
    Creative Imaginations Thin Wood Veneer Paper
    Ranger Ink – Frayed Burlap
    Sookwang Be Creative Tape (double-sided adhesive) Sheets
    Quickie Glue Pen
    Fairy Dust Glitter – Sugar Shimmer
    Rock-It Rhinestone Template material
    Rhinestone Transfer Tape
    SS6 Siam Ruby Rhinestones
    SS10 Jet Black and Orange Rhinestones
    SS16 Jet Black Rhinestones
    Cutting file designed in Make The Cut

    Steps:

    (1) Cut a base card: 5.5″ x 8.25″, score in the middle and fold.

    (2) Insert glue pen into Zing Pen Tool. While you can insert glue pens directly into the grip on the Zing, I needed to make sure my snowflakes were drawn in very specific locations. Using the pen tool would center the pen in the same location I used for the blade when I calibrated the laser. I then used WYSIWYG mode in MTC to draw the snowflakes after setting the origin for my cut by putting the laser light in the very tippity corner of my card front.

    (3) Cut out the snow bank from Sookwang double-sided adhesive sheets. Peel one side, apply to the bottom of the card, and then peel off the other side. Apply glitter to both the snowflakes and the snow bank. Brush away excess glitter.

    (4) Cut out tree trunk and snowman arms from wood veneer paper. Darken with Ranger Frayed Burlap ink. Glue into place on the card.

    (5) Apply Heat n Bond to the reverse side of the three fabrics. Cut out the tree, snowman body and snowman hat, using the KNK Zing fabric blade. Arrange in place on the card and then press with home iron set to cotton setting.

    (6) Cut the rhinestone template and then, because of there being so few holes, just place the various stones into the template by hand. (Cutting a template probably wouldn’t be necessary if this were just one card. But because I was making ten cards, the template worked great!) After arranging the stone, lift with rhinestone transfer tape and then press with a hot iron for 10 seconds.

    The settings I used are covered in the Zing User Manual, available here.

    That’s it! LOVE my KNK Zing and had fun using it in so many different ways!

    Embossing on the Zing!


    The above thank you card is my test of the new Zing embossing tool on cardstock. I have a method for obtaining a thicker-than-normal embossed line that I describe below. I highly recommend it when embossing cardstock as it is an easy way to get a great look!

    Materials
    Smooth cardstock
    Zing Embossing Tool
    Embossing mat
    Coordinating ribbon

    Method
    (1) For an embossing mat, I use a 12″ x 12″ cut of Duck Brand solid shelf liner with repositionable adhesive applied to the top. The mat was pressed to the top of my Zing mat, with the sticky side up. Then the cardstock was pressed to the top of the embossing mat.
    (2) In Make The Cut, I imported two heart shapes from the Basic Shapes. I used Times New Roman to type the word Thanks.
    (3) To make the thicker embossed outline, I used the Shadow function and created both an Inline and an Outline, both only 0.01″ thick. This then forces the embossing tool to do three different outlines, but very close together, creating an overall thicker embossed line.
    (4) For embossing on the Zing, I used a force of 130, speed of 10, and 3 passes. I used the larger end of the embossing tool. After embossing, I cut out the card, while it was still on the embossing mat. If you are diligent about making sure the blade tip isn’t extended beyond the thickness of the cardstock, you can cut out shapes using this same shelf liner mat. (Thank you to Michelle Hessler of Paper Threads for that tip!) The photo below shows a close-up of the embossing.
    (5) I then used a Scor-Pal to create a center fold for the card and added ribbon to the top and bottom.

    Blinging Gabriella’s Shorts!

    My son’s girlfriend enjoys all aspects of my business, especially the part involving rhinestones! : ) So, when she asked me if I could add some bling to an existing pair of shorts, I immediately said, “Yes” because the task would be easy to do and yield great results! This is how I made it happen:

    Materials
    Pair of shorts
    KNK Zing
    Scanner
    Rhinestone Template Material
    Stencil Board
    Rhinestone Transfer Tape
    SS16 Topaz Rhinestones
    Shur-Line Trim and Touchup Pad
    Home iron or Heating Press

    Method
    (1) I scanned the shorts into my computer so that I could use the existing embroidery pattern on the shorts as a guide for creating the design.

    (2) In Make The Cut, I imported the scan and then manually traced the curve of the embroidery pattern. Here’s a video showing how that was done: Simple Curve Trace in MTC.

    (3) Next I measured the width of the design on the actual pocket and resized the pattern on the screen to match. Then I used the Rhinestone function in MTC to apply the circles. Because you always need to cut circles that are about 0.5 mm larger than the nominal stone size, I chose SS19 (0.17 in) for the circle size. For the spacing, I used 0.02″.

    (4) Then I made a mirrored copy of the pattern for the other pocket.

    (5) Using the KNK Zing, I cut the patterns from cardstock first to make sure they were designed at the correct size and alignment to the existing pattern. Then I cut the patterns from the rhinestone template material using a force of 90, speed of 10 and two passes. I then pressed the two patterns to stencil board.

    (6) I used the Shur-line pad to brush the stones into the templates. Then used rhinestone transfer tape to lift the stones out of the templates and arrange onto the short pockets. If you’ve never seen this process done, please check out a video I made a few years ago using the KNK Maxx, as the process is the same: Cutting Rhinestone Template Material on the Maxx

    (7) With my home iron set to High, the stones were then heat-pressed onto the shorts. I pressed firmly for 15 seconds. Then I moved the iron slightly over and pressed for another 10 seconds. The second pressing insures that steam holes are not over any of the stones during the first pressing. After cooling, I peeled off the transfer tape and the shorts were ready for Gabriella to wear!

    Here is a before photo:

    And here is a close-up of one of the completed pockets:

    AHOY! A Beach Themed Card Swap


    My local group of crafting friends do cards swaps and our last one was based on a beach theme. I found a really cute card idea on the Internet to “borrow from” and proceeded to create a very similar card using KNK Studio and my 15″ KNK Maxx.

    First, I traced the sea creatures from the photo using the polyarc/manual tracing function in KNK Studio. After cutting the crab, octopus, and starfish from three different colors of cardstock, I then used embossing folders to add different textures to the creatures. This was the first time I had used my Epic embossing machine since buying it several years ago! How sad is that? lol

    The eyes are obvious… I glued on googly eyes. Behind the “smile holes” in each creature I glued a small black cardstock oval, also cut on the Maxx. And then each creature was pop-dotted to a light blue card.

    For the water, I also used KNK Studio’s polyarc function to design some waves and then I cut these waves from blue paper. The waves seemed a bit “dull” so I inked them with Ranger Broken China distress ink.

    For the word “AHOY”, I picked a font called Feetish and cut the letters from Sookwang double-sided adhesive sheets. Without removing the letters from the surrounding waste, I carefully peeled off the back sheet of the parts I needed to press down to the card first. After arranging on top of the wave, I then removed the surrounding waste, peeled off the top sheet of the cut letters and then applied gold colored embossing powder. However, I did not apply heat because it causes the powder to turn a deep gold. I preferred the raw look which more closely resembled, in my opinion, sand with sun hitting it:

    So, there you have it! Wish I could share the cutting files, but because I used someone’s manufactured card, I will not share. Maybe this will be an incentive for some of you to give the manual tracing feature in KNK Studio a try? It’s VERY powerful and actually kind of fun and relaxing at the same time! Kind of like a day at the beach!