Klic-N-Kut – Retail Merchandising Partner

Using your Klic-N-Kut electronic cutter is a great way to create displays that focus on new or special products in a retail environment.  These displays can be in the form of story boards, posters, signs, tags, removable vinyl lettering on windows, and other mediums that can be cut on a Klic-N-Kut.  The purpose of these displays is to provide the customers with information about the products as well as insight and suggestions for the use of the products that is not readily apparent on the product packaging. The displays can provide initial education about a product to the customer at their own pace.

During preparations for the Klic-N-Kut retreat in Chandler, AZ, my friend, Lynn, introduced me to the art of story boards.  The ones we made used the three panel corrugated cardboard display boards that can be purchased at many hobby and office supply stores.  The three panels open up to form a 36″ high by 48″ wide display surface.  Recently I created one of these story boards to present two new quilting rulers at a quilt show and subsequently in the sewing machine/quilt fabric store.

RulerStoryboard2-Optimized

Materials Used:

Various cardstocks

Decal Vinyl

Photo paper

Printed descriptions, labels, and information

Settings:

15″ Maxx Air

Standard Material Blade – Red Cap

Force – because a variety of card stocks were used the force was between 45 and 70 with some cardstocks requiring 2 passes, for the vinyl a force of 8 was used

Speed – cardstock – 125,   vinyl – 90

To highlight the fact that several different shapes in several sizes could be cut from each of the two rulers, these shapes were cut out of cardstock in actual finished sizes and displayed in a stacked format on the storyboard.  The colors used for these shapes on the storyboard are the same colors as in the literature that accompanies the rulers.  This provides a familiar link when the customer reads the literature in preparation for using the rulers. Additional copies of these shapes were cut and were available for customers to use at the show and in the store to trial different layouts in different sizes.

Several patterns are available for creating items using these rulers.  Copies of the front of these patterns were printed on photo paper, matted with cardstock and added to the storyboard.  Additional information about the rulers was printed and included on the storyboard.

To create the shapes, the rulers were scanned into the computer.  The images were imported into KNK Studio software and adjusted to the actual sizes.  Then the shapes were separated into the various sizes.  A Transform/Inline function was used to remove the 1/4″ seam allowance to provide shapes that were the actual finished size.

17 thoughts on “Klic-N-Kut – Retail Merchandising Partner

  1. I think the KNK machines are just beginning to show people how wonderful they are and the many applications you can use them for!!

  2. Thank you so much for this, I help with school projects and this is wonderful for such!

  3. I love my Zing and have found lots of ways to use it. Thanks for another idea for how to use it!

  4. Great application, Judy! I love the story boards you and Lynn made and brought to the KNK Retreat, as well. They got a lot of attention by our attendees, too!

  5. The ideas are endless of what we can do with our KNK machines! Awesome idea! And the Ideas are running in my head on how I can do something like this for my daycare kids, something fun!

  6. This is a wonderful post! Your story board is smashing and I am sure very helpful to the customer in choosing and using products available from the retailer. I’m sure she is going to enlist you for more applications.

  7. Great idea! I have done a similar type thing for my daughter’s science projects the last few years. MTC is so easy to use, she is able to type it up herself and size it. I just help her with the cutting. She could probably do that to, but I supervise as I don’t want to hurt my baby zing in any way.

  8. I made several six foot tall boards for a luncheon at the local University. Thank heavens for our digital die cutters.

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