Etch a Ceramic Jar with Armour Etch – Color it with Gilders Wax

I have done etching on glass a few times, but wanted to see how it would work on ceramic. A few of these cute little ceramic jars have been sitting in my craft room since I found them on clearance a few years ago. The nice smooth surface provided just the canvas I needed to try out this project.

Material:

  1. Ceramic Jar
  2. Armour Etch Cream
  3. Gilders Paste Wax
  4. Vinyl for Stencil
  5. Transfer Tape
  6. Paint Brush
  7. Protective clothing, such as rubber gloves, goggles, apron
  8. Red Capped Blade

Setting for KNK Zing:

  1. Force – 18
  2. Speed – 10
  3. Multicut – 1

Steps:

  1. Open or download design in cutter software.
  2. Load vinyl and cut stencil.
  3. Weed vinyl stencil.
  4. Apply transfer tape to vinyl, remove backing, and apply stencil to ceramic surface.
  5. Remove transfer tape.
  6. Use paint brush to apply etching cream liberally, being careful not to extend the cream beyond the edge of your stencil.
  7. Leave the cream on a few minutes. I left mine on about 3 minutes.
  8. Clean off thoroughly under running water.
  9. Peel off stencil and dry completely.the
  10. Use a rag to apply Gilders Wax to etched surface. Continue rubbing to remove from non-etched area. (The wax sets quickly, so I had best luck by removing excess wax as soon as possible. It can be removed later, but takes a lot more effort.)

    I left the stencil in place while applying some of the wax, but it is not necessary.

I realized after I started the project that it was not a good idea to plan a two-color project where the two colors were directly adjacent to each other. It was very difficult to apply the end of the “green” stem within the red cherry portion of the design,

I also attempted this on a ceramic tile. It worked, but I wasn’t happy with the end result. The entire tile apparently was a little porous as I was not able to completely remove the excess wax from the surface of the tile. This might be remedied by leaving the stencil in place while applying the Gilders Wax. I may have to give it another try.

 

 

Stencils from vinyl for an easy peasy Le Boudoir wood plaque

Spring Break is over, boo hoo. I don’t feel like I even got a break. Why not? Because my dear husband volunteered to paint my mom’s house and even though I only spent 4 days over there during break I feel like I had zero time for myself for the entire holiday. Well, until today when I finally got to finish my stencil project.

Mom selected a dark pinkish red for her master bedroom, and it is a much bolder look than I would have expected from her. My mom is in Florida for the winter so she hasn’t even seen it yet. I jokingly told her that she wasn’t allowed to call it her bedroom – it is now the boudoir.

I used Harrington font and created the border from a variety of basic shapes that I skewed and welded together. Next I traced the chandelier from a free image and voila!

Materials:

Settings for vinyl (Maxx Air):

  • f = 28
  • v = 300
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Create your design in your favorite software
  2. Cut the vinyl and weed the waste
  3. Use transfer tape to pick up the design and transfer to the wood plaque   vinyl stencil
  4. Use a squeegee to adhere the vinyl to the wood, remove the transfer tape  
  5. Paint as desired   stencil peeled off
  6. Remove stencil vinyl  
  7. Fill in with color or simply cover with the Matte coating   stencil area filled in with color
    The copic marker spreads by just touching the wood and fills in the color. The painted area keeps it locked in. I coated the entire plaque with matte coating.

I’m going to mount it over the bedroom door before she gets home from Florida – tee hee hee. lol

50th Celebration Tile

Oh, what a day!

Have you ever had one of those days when it seems like nothing goes right? You just can’t get things to work they way you thought they would? Well, I’m having one of those. I had a project on the back burner just waiting for a play date with the Force. First I couldn’t find my rotary tool collets or drill bits – well, I haven’t used them since the last KNK Retreat so I can’t even remember what I might have done with them. Okay, scratch that project. Next, I wanted to make a stencil to screen print a t-shirt for my daughter and I darned if I can remember where the screens are. Now, those I haven’t seen for a year so they could be anywhere!

Then I decided to try out some thermo-fusible adhesive and that project totally bombed, I can’t even show you because I threw it out with the trash. 🙂 It’s okay though because I learned several things not to do and a few things that I can do!

Next I took a break and ate the yummy steak my husband grilled for me in the frigid 9 degree Fahrenheit weather.

Okay, back to work.

All in all, my KNK machines work perfect and they are the only reason I was able to complete the next project on my list!

I pulled a free shared image off the web and pixel traced it in Make-the-Cut, then I cut it out of vinyl for a stencil, and double side adhesive for foil.

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Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air):

  • Vinyl
    • f = 24
    • v = 250
    • p = 1
  • Double sided adhesive
    • f = 52
    • v = 250
    • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Create or open the design in MTC
  2. Cut the file from vinyl and double sided adhesive using the listed settings (I cut one corner square so that it would line up with my tile easily) stencil
  3. Apply the vinyl stencil and ink the tile
  4. Carefully remove the vinyl and heat set the ink (I forgot to take a pic with the vinyl on the tile except for the little pieces I circled) heat set ink
  5. Apply the double sided adhesive and remove the non-stick liner   double sided adhesive
  6. Apply the foil, press on well (don’t do what I did and scratch the surface with the squeegee)  foil
  7. Remove the file and put it on display (on your KNP3D printed easel)  finished project

Glass tiles are fun to use and I like how the surface image casts a shadow.

Whew, I think I need to rest now. Hope you enjoyed today’s project from Team KNK!

Freezer Paper? Fantastic and Fun Paper!

I use burlap for a variety of seasonal decorations and I had some tucked away especially for the coming holidays. It is important to use a good quality burlap for a couple of reasons: 1) it will make your life sooo much easier when assembling your product 2) your finished project will last much longer and 3) quality burlap just looks nicer!

First project for this season, Fall Greetings for the entryway!

I started this project with a tan burlap infused with gold threads and some freezer paper. Then I created my words in Make-the-Cut, reversed the image, and cut it out using vinyl settings. I made sure to use a font that didn’t have many loose interior pieces. With the Harrington font, I had to use the eraser tool to leave a tag for the center of the “A”.

Freezer paper is such a wonderful medium, and so easy to use! I ironed it onto my burlap and then taped off the edges.

Stencil made from freezer paper

I used Tulip fabric paint to paint the words onto the burlap. On fabric this product dries almost instantly. On the freezer paper it stayed wet for a long time.

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I didn’t have the patience to wait so I removed the the outer edges by hand and the inside pieces with tweezers (and now have a very interesting black pattern on my hands). The freezer paper peels off very nicely.

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I love it! Next I cut two rectangles and sewed three of the edges. Then I filled it with bean bag ‘beans’.

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Next, I used Elmer’s glue to seal the last edge. These clips came in handy to hold the edges until they dried.

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Once dry, I finished closing up the last edge and set it on my entryway table.

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The “Recipe”:

Materials:

  1. Burlap
  2. Freezer paper
  3. KNK digital cutting system
  4. Standard (red cap) Blade
  5. Iron
  6. Tulip aerosol fabric paint
  7. Blue tape
  8. Scrap paper
  9. Needle and thread
  10. Filling/stuffing
  11. Elmer’s Glue

Settings (Maxx Air):

  • f = 20
  • v = 225
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Create your design in the software.
  2. Reverse the image
  3. Cut the stencil.
  4. Apply to the fabric.
  5. Spray the fabric paint.
  6. Remove the stencil.
  7. Finish your project. For this pillow, I sewed 3 edges and then filled it and finally I closed it up.

Happy Fall everyone!

Reclaiming Glass with Stencils

I really didn’t know what to title this post, so I thought about it overnight and still didn’t come up with anything, lol. In the end, it just made sense to state exactly what we did – reclaimed used glass with stencils.

My husband found this solid oak, Amish-made gun cabinet on the local Swap and Sell facebook page. We took a drive to check it out and he decided he had to have it. The biggest issue was the sandblasted etching on the glass. The door itself was built around the glass, so we would need a woodworker to replace it, but my husband didn’t want to weaken the integrity of the door. That left us with the option of altering the glass while still in the door frame.

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We put some scrap vinyl over a letter to see how badly it would show through, and then a second layer. The sandblasted texture definitely would show through both layers. I knew that acid etching wouldn’t match the texture, so that was out. It was time to get creative.

I measured the area that had been etched, and created it in Make-the-Cut. Then we tried out different shapes to cover it, until he found the one he liked best. I cut the stencil out of 24″ wide vinyl on the roll using a slow speed. I covered the stencil with transfer paper to pick up the thin border and then I used application fluid to give me some time to adjust/move the vinyl around to get it positioned perfectly. After two tries applying the vinyl to the door, we decided to trim it down to just a few inches all the way around because it was just too hard to handle 24″ of vinyl.

Once the stencil was in position, and we had squeegeed the water and bubbles out, we masked the area using freezer paper – one of my favorite multipurpose craft supplies.

stencils

At this point, I had to decide if I was going to use acid etch to make the glass hold the paint securely or try something else. In the end, since it was a very large area and I don’t have a lot of acid etch on hand, we decided to use an universal bonding primer (it boasts that it bonds to ANY surface – let’s hope that’s accurate).

Universal Bonding Primer

Universal Bonding Primer

After the primer had dried completely, we added a stone coat paint. This was how we were going to hide the sandblasted letters within the stencil area. On top of the stone coat, I also added a Matte Finish Coat. Then, the big REVEAL!

stencils

There was some water under the vinyl in the upper left hand corner, and it had watered down the primer there. Once it dried completely, I placed small strips of vinyl over the clear glass and touched it up.

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Now that the previous owner’s etched ‘sign’ is covered, hubby just has to decide what he wants to put on it. 😉

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air 24″):

  • f = 28
  • v = 150
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Measure the area to be stenciled
  2. Create or find a pattern that will cover the area
  3. Cut the vinyl
  4. Apply the vinyl and mask
  5. Paint according to directions
  6. Peel away the mask and vinyl