A wedding plaque

I had a special request for a sign for a wedding. It had leaves, lots of leaves, and the guests were each suppose to sign a leaf at  the reception. She sent me a Pintrest picture of what she wanted. I was able to make the leaf and the stems in shapes and then went to Layout/array and made multiple leaves and stems. I then scattered them all over the space and when I had them all where I wanted I welded them together, along with an open rectangle in the center.

 

I then weeded out the leaves and the center rectangle and applied it to a stained wood plaque. I painted over the areas that I had weeded and waited until the paint was fairly dry before removing the vinyl.

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Here is the finished result.

Materials

vinyl

transfer tape

stained wood plaque

paint

Settings

15″ KNK Maxx

red capped blade

Force 36

Speed 450

 

Reclaiming Glass with Stencils

I really didn’t know what to title this post, so I thought about it overnight and still didn’t come up with anything, lol. In the end, it just made sense to state exactly what we did – reclaimed used glass with stencils.

My husband found this solid oak, Amish-made gun cabinet on the local Swap and Sell facebook page. We took a drive to check it out and he decided he had to have it. The biggest issue was the sandblasted etching on the glass. The door itself was built around the glass, so we would need a woodworker to replace it, but my husband didn’t want to weaken the integrity of the door. That left us with the option of altering the glass while still in the door frame.

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We put some scrap vinyl over a letter to see how badly it would show through, and then a second layer. The sandblasted texture definitely would show through both layers. I knew that acid etching wouldn’t match the texture, so that was out. It was time to get creative.

I measured the area that had been etched, and created it in Make-the-Cut. Then we tried out different shapes to cover it, until he found the one he liked best. I cut the stencil out of 24″ wide vinyl on the roll using a slow speed. I covered the stencil with transfer paper to pick up the thin border and then I used application fluid to give me some time to adjust/move the vinyl around to get it positioned perfectly. After two tries applying the vinyl to the door, we decided to trim it down to just a few inches all the way around because it was just too hard to handle 24″ of vinyl.

Once the stencil was in position, and we had squeegeed the water and bubbles out, we masked the area using freezer paper – one of my favorite multipurpose craft supplies.

stencils

At this point, I had to decide if I was going to use acid etch to make the glass hold the paint securely or try something else. In the end, since it was a very large area and I don’t have a lot of acid etch on hand, we decided to use an universal bonding primer (it boasts that it bonds to ANY surface – let’s hope that’s accurate).

Universal Bonding Primer

Universal Bonding Primer

After the primer had dried completely, we added a stone coat paint. This was how we were going to hide the sandblasted letters within the stencil area. On top of the stone coat, I also added a Matte Finish Coat. Then, the big REVEAL!

stencils

There was some water under the vinyl in the upper left hand corner, and it had watered down the primer there. Once it dried completely, I placed small strips of vinyl over the clear glass and touched it up.

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Now that the previous owner’s etched ‘sign’ is covered, hubby just has to decide what he wants to put on it. 😉

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air 24″):

  • f = 28
  • v = 150
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Measure the area to be stenciled
  2. Create or find a pattern that will cover the area
  3. Cut the vinyl
  4. Apply the vinyl and mask
  5. Paint according to directions
  6. Peel away the mask and vinyl

 

 

 

Chevron

I have been wanting to try this for a while and then this order came in and it was the perfect time to try it. The customer wanted a chevron pattern with words on top. I had made one in the past with a vinyl chevron and vinyl letters on top. But this time I wanted the canvas to be painted with vinyl. So I had a plain white 12×12 canvas from Michaels and I cut a 13″ wide x  12″ tall Chevron pattern from white outdoor vinyl. I cut it wider so that it would cover the sides. (The file was from My Vinyl Designers.) I applied the vinyl to the canvas. Once I had it securely in place I applied a coat of Mod Podge over the entire canvas. I did this because I read that it seals it so paint doesn’t seep under. I then painted it with Rustoleum 2X spray paint and let it dry for a few minutes. I then removed the vinyl. I did notice there was still some seepage but using my exacto knife I was able to scrape  off the paint that seeped through. I then let it dry for 24 hours and applied the verse which was  cut from indoor vinyl.

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Materials

12×12 canvas

Rustoleum 2x paint

Vinyl

Mod Podge

Settings

KNK Maxx

red capped blade

force 46

speed 400

Don’t forget to enter…the deadline is June 21st and the grand prize is a Zing!!!!

 

SummerSolsticeAnn

 

 

Tag Team

I have a friend who loves to paint furniture and does a beautiful job. I have a hard time with painting beautiful wood but yet I love her things. She has a blog called Create~Inspire.
The first thing I “tag teamed” with Lisa on was this wood plaque.

I had made some plaques with rough wood and the vinyl didn’t stick as well as I would have liked. I had painted the plaque black and applied white letters. Lisa took the plaque and painted it white, then she peeled off the vinyl letters. It looks so great!
Lisa likes to do fun things with furniture. She has a cricut but has asked me to cut vinyl for her because she is so limited with what she can cut and what fonts she has. One thing she asked me to cut was a clock face to put on top of a table she planned on painting. So I cut the clock face using basic wall vinyl found at KNK USA. I cut it using my 15″ KNK Maxx, a standard blade, with pressure set at 36 and speed at 200. I always use a slower speed with vinyl. This was a larger piece, 24 inches round, so I used the ginsu knife and cut the file in half and cut it in 2 pieces. Lisa applied the vinyl to the table, panted the table white, removed the vinyl and distressed the whole table. It turned out so cute I bought it from her and it makes me smile every time I look at it. :O)