Parked Ticked

That’s right – Parked Ticket, not Parking Ticket.  In the accounting system used by the store where I work, there is the ability to ‘run a tab’ for customers while they are in classes and need to purchase supplies.  The system’s name for those ‘tabs’ is Parked Tickets.  It is a very handy feature to have.  Unfortunately, with several employees working at any one time and customers asking different ones to add items to a Parked Ticket for them, we sometimes ended up with multiple Parked Tickets for the same person on the same day.

The owner wanted something to remind both customers and employees that a customer had a Parked Ticket in the system.  She thought if we had some kind of a token that we gave to the customer when we created a Parked Ticket that it would remind all of us that one existed.  She asked me if I could make something on my “magic cutter” – my KNK Force.  This is what we ended up with.

Materials Used:

Cardstock

Copy Paper

Laminating Sleeves

Settings :

Machine:  KNK Force, Blade:  Standard Material Blade (red cap),  Passes:  1, Blade Tensions:  2 – 2 1/2 (depending on cardstock),  Cutting Depth:  40 – 65 (depending on cardstock), Cutting Speed:  25, Blade Offset:  Red Blade,  Overcut:  38

Information:

Car shapes were created in Make the Cut.  The cars were cut out of cardstock and a ‘sign’ pasted on one side.  They were then laminated so they would have a rectangular shape, be all the same size, and would be more durable than just cardstock.  A hole is punched into one corner so they can hang on a hook by each of the cash registers.  When a Parking Ticket is started for a customer, they are handed one of these ‘reminders’ and their name is written on it with a dry erase marker so it can be identified in case of a mix-up.  When they check out, the employee knows to look for the Parked Ticket instead of starting a new ticket and can erase the name and return the car to the parking lot (the hook by the register).  So far it has worked well and both customers and employees find it helpful.  And, I enjoy finding ways to make creative and helpful things with my Force.

 

Perfect Applique Pieces

Since my post last month about learning to use the Zing to cut fabric applique pieces, I’ve been using both the Zing and Force to practice and learn more about that.  The most important piece of information that I can share with you is that you MUST have a sharp blade to get clean cuts!!!  I struggled for a long time one day and was getting very frustrated trying to cut some fabric pieces until I used a new blade.  What a difference that one thing made!  And, yes, I can see exactly what pieces I cut by the markings on my mat since I neglected to reduce the blade settings when I put in the new fabric blade.

This is a picture of the finished applique on the back of my shirt jacket.  Isn’t he a cute little guy?  Actually he measures just a bit over 7″ square.

optimized-pug

Materials Used:

Quilting weight cotton fabrics with Steam-A-Seam Lite fused to the wrong side.

Settings:

Machine used: KNK Force, blade: Fabric, Blade Tension: 2.5, Passes: 1, Starting/Ending Depth: 10, Cut Speed: 25, Blade Offset: .75, Overcut: .5

Information/Instructions:

The embroidery design is from an Anita Goodesign collection “Casual Friday” that will be released in December.  I am fortunate to work at a store that gets previews of soon to be released designs.

In order to prepare the applique piece cutting files, I open the design in my Viking Premier+ software and manually trace the applique piece shapes.  Then I export those shapes as SVG files.  The shapes are imported into Make The Cut and cut directly to the Zing or exported as SVG files to be used on the Force.  That description makes it sound as if it is a complicated and involved process but after the first couple of times it really goes quite quickly and since I have a background in computer programming, I enjoy doing it.

Here is a screen shot of the applique pieces as they appear in MTC.  As you can see from the picture, a lot of the fabric is overstitched with threads in the embroidery process.

optimized-pieces In order to introduce the store customers to the “cool” way to create perfect applique pieces, I am teaching two classes this week in which they will be making an embroidered pot holder with pre-cut pieces.  They will prepare their fabrics ahead of time by fusing Steam-A-Seam Lite onto the wrong side.  During class, we will cut the applique pieces for them to use in their embroidery using the Zing.

This is what they will be making.
optimized-skillet   And these are the pieces we will be cutting.

optimized-skillet-pieces

Homecoming… or HoCo…

as I learned it was called. This month my son asked me to help make him a sign to ask a girl to the Homecoming Dance. He told me he wanted the theme to be Sponge bob, so he downloaded the picture of the pirate from the internet and printed it out. From there, we used MTC to design the sign (drew a rectangle the size of the sign and designed inside that rectangle.) We also downloaded a free sponge bob font from the internet. Here it is:

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Sorry the color is so bad on the picture. We worked on it the night before he presented it to her. We cut the vinyl out in green and then he wanted to use a marker to draw the square where she could check off her answer (notice there was no option for no) and he wanted a speech bubble.

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He says this is a horrible picture of him, but here he is at school asking her to the dance.

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I was told she isn’t a fan of taking pictures, but she did say yes and they had a great time together. Just as an aside: He has been in love with her since Kindergarten, but they have remained friends through out the years. He will probably clobber me for telling the inter webs that, so ssshhhhh. 🙂 🙂

Machine:

KNK Maxx 24

Materials

Tagboard from Dollar Tree (50 cents! And vinyl goes on it great!) They also sell the foam core for a buck and that works great too!

green vinyl… from my closet… that dark and scary place

Spongebob font from www.dafont.com. It’s free. Cuts okay, the letter spacing is a little funky, but my son told me I wasn’t allowed to fix the kerning issues that were bugging me. 🙂

Until next month!

amaZING!!

Today I had my first experience using a KNK Zing Air.  It is an amazing little machine!!  Recently there has been a surge of interest in using electronic cutters to cut fabric pieces for applique both for people who do hand applique and those who applique by machine.  The shop where I work has decided that the KNK Zing Air is the best cutter for the job.  (I might have had a bit of influence in the decision 🙂 ).  Friday two Zing Air cutters arrived at the shop.  Today (Sunday) one of them is helping me prepare my post.

A friend who works with us at the shop had a request to create an applique for a wall hanging she wants to create.  She explained her plan to me and provided a copy of a photo that was her inspiration.  I was able to use an existing file from the Make The Cut Gallery and node edit it so it resembled the photos.

Materials Used:

Cotton Quilting Fabric backed with Heat-N-Bond

Cotton Quilting Fabric backed with Steam-A-Seam Lite 2

Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl

Settings:

Machine Used:  KNK Zing Air

For Cotton Fabrics: Fabric blade, Speeds 11/15, Force 75, Multi 2, Offset .75, PIN 25

For Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl:  Red blade, Speeds 15/15, Force 30, Multi 1, Offset .25, PIN 25

optimized-skulls

Okay, skulls are not my thing, but—.  The request was for a 4″ high skull cut from fabric so it could be appliqued onto a base fabric.  The green one in the picture is about 3.5″ high because I forgot that the measurements in the bar in MTC also include the vector handles.  So I corrected the size before cutting the others.  The green one has Heat-N-Bond fused to the back of the fabric.  The two pieces did not get cut cleanly apart because the Zing mat was not sticky enough to hold the fabric in place while cutting.  The white one has Steam-A-Seam Lite 2 fused to the back of the fabric and the Steam-A-Seam itself is sticky so that stickiness, in addition to the adhesive on the mat, was successful in holding the fabric in place for a clean cut.  After seeing the amount of detail that would have to be dealt with in using this design for an applique, I thought that the Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl would be a better choice for the applique and it would not have to be stitched down.  The black glittery skull was cut from this vinyl.  And I did remember to mirror the image before cutting the vinyl since it is cut from the back side.

So now I know a little about the Zing and will be able to help customers as they expand their skills into our world of Klic-N-Kut.

you’re tearrific part 2

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I saw this cute die on the sizzix web site so I decided to draw my own using Inkscape and MTC. Usually you can easily trace these in MTC, but I hadn’t drawn anything in awhile and there were very few curves in this, other than the handle. I did trace the cup and spoon attachment though, which is why I can’t share those. I changed up some things as well so not to step on any copyright toes.

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The sides kind of taper in at the top, which was a bit of a trick to draw, but I think I got it. It’s not perfect, but it worked.

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It comfortably holds 3 teabags.

djm_teabag-holder1-mtc

Here’s the file if you want to make one. It just includes the teabag holder. I used a Martha Stewart punch for the front and I have some coffee/tea clear stamps I used for the “you’re teariffic” part.

Materials:

K&C double sided designer paper

glue

twine

Martha Stewart punch

clear stamp

Machine:

KNK Zing

red blade: 10/10, 90

 

So I gave it to the aide that works in my classroom and she seemed to like it a lot. 🙂