Create a Pennant and Pom Pom Bunting for Your Craft Space

Photo of "CREATE" pennant bannerAdd some fun and inspiration to your craft space with this cute pennant and pom pom bunting. It’s an easy DIY project using your favorite KNK machine and common craft room supplies. 

Now that we are well into February, and many of our friends in the milder climates are even talking spring, I thought I’d change up my ornament garland on my little studio fireplace to something more appropriate for this time of year. Since pom poms seem to be popular right now, I combined them with some little pennants for a fun bunting.

Materials:

  • Yarn of your choice
  • Large needle
  • Ribbon, twine, or string
  • Heavy cardstock or art paper (I used 100 lb Bristol)
  • Scoring Stylus (optional)
  • Printer
  • Red Capped Blade
  • Make The Cut software (If you are using SCAL, you will just have to adjust some of the instructions and steps below.)
  • CREATE pennant file or other file of your choice

I am not a pom pom pro, but they are pretty easy to make and I was lucky to find some variegated yarn in my stash that I knew would work well. After a little practice, I was satisfied with my results. I used cotton yarn and wrapped it around 2 or 3 fingers about 40 times. Then, I removed it from my fingers, and tied a small length of yarn very tightly around the middle of the bunch. Next, I cut the loops on both ends and fluffed the balls. My pom poms didn’t turn out very uniform, so I did a lot of trimming to get them roundish. Close Up Photo of Pennant and Pom Pom Bunting

KNK Zing Settings with MTC Software:

  • Force – 130
  • Multicut – 2 or 3
  • Speed – 10

The SVG file can be simply copied and then pasted into MTC. Each portion should be on a separate layer. I created a third layer with a rectangle surrounding the pennants which I set as the bottom layer. (I may not have needed the rectangle, but I wanted to make sure the registration marks stayed in the same exact place for the printing and cutting. By having the rectangle layer turned on for both steps, the registration marks never moved.)

I labeled the image layer, “Print Only”, the cut line layer, “Cut Only”, and the rectangle layer, “Print and Cut”. This was to remind me which layers should be turned on, and which should be turned off for each step.

Screenshot of Layers in MTC.

 

Steps:

  • Open Pennant and Pom Pom file (or file of your choice) in Make the Cut.
  • Prepare for printing. Make sure the check box for “Print Registration Marks” is checked in Print Options. Double-check that your print layer is on and cut layer is off. Photo of Pennants on Mat after Print and Cut
  • Print
  • Place printed image on mat. (I have learned from a multitude of errors, to make sure my mat is sticky enough, and scrapped clean of extra paper scraps, residue, lint, etc. This will save you both time and wasted material.)
  • Turn on the cut layer and make sure that the print layer is off. Follow instructions for print and cut.
  • Remove pennants from the mat.Photo of using a stylus to emboss dots in scalloped area
  • If desired, turn pennant over and use stylus to emboss dots in scallopsClose Up Photo showing Details of Pennants
  • Thread a large needle with the ribbon or twine. Start stringing pom poms by sticking the needle through a pom pom so that it goes right through the middle. Alternate pennants and pom poms, starting and ending with a pom pom.

Display your new bunting in your craft space for a little fun inspiration. It will make you smile!
Photo of Pennant and Pom Pom Bunting

 

Handmade Napkins Decorated with Heat Transfer Vinyl

Photo of Handmade Napkins Heat Transfer VinylSometimes it’s nice to have a set of cloth napkins. No need to save them for special occasions; they are fun for everyday use. A lightweight cotton fabric works great, and can be quickly cut and hemmed. Make these handmade napkins decorated with heat transfer vinyl.

I used this tutorial, written by Theresa on the Spoonflower blog for tips on sewing the napkins. I really like the way she explains her mitered corner method. It reduces bulk at the corners and provides a nice finished look.

I cut my napkins from 34 inch wide fabric, which enabled me to create 4 from a yard. I cut 4 squares at 17 inches and kept the hems fairly small to give me finished napkins that are about 16 inches square. (Of course, you can simply purchase blank napkins and add the HTV, but making them is more fun!)

Materials:

Settings on Zing:

  • Force – 25
  • Speed – 10
  • Multicut – 1 or 2

Steps:

  • Cut and sew napkins as described above.
  • Import file in cutting software. Don’t forget to mirror design to prepare for HTV application.
  • Cut and weed heat transfer vinyl.
  • Use iron or heat press to apply heat transfer vinyl to napkin, according to manufacturers instructions.

Enjoy your new napkins or give to a friend!Handmade Napkins Decorated with Heat Transfer Vinyl

 

 

 

 

Give Thanks

Well hello there KNK-ers!

I seem to be on a banner kick, so I bring you yet another one.

These pictures are horrible. I totally procrastinated and it’s dark and believe it or not, I took these in my dim living room with no flash. I’m actually impressed with this little Canon camera I bought a couple months ago, and considering my lighting conditions are horrible, these pictures could be a lot worse.

Materials:

12×12 chipboard

recollections paper

DCWV thanksgiving/halloween stack

font: merit

leaves: www.lovesvg.com 

I used the leaves from the harvest designs and I ran them through the fiskers to give the leaves some texture and then inked them with some brown and green inks.

I wish I had prettier ribbon, but I didn’t have anything on hand, so I used jute.

Machine:

Zing, red blade 10/10

Until next time!

 

 

Flour Sack Towel with Heat Transfer Vinyl – Zing Orbit with Sure Cuts Alot

Flour Sack Towel  Heat Transfer Towel Our little town does not have much to offer visitors. So when I saw that our local fish market had expanded and started selling items highlighting our area, I asked them if they’d like me to make up a few things for them to offer. I had made this file into a shirt for my husband last year using an inkjet transfer. I decided it would do well on a flour sack towel with a few changes. This time I used Heat Transfer Vinyl.

I recently purchased a KNK Zing Orbit and am now using Sure Cuts Alot. Being accustomed to Make The Cut, there has been a small learning curve, but for basic cutting I was able to get right at it with no problems.

Materials:

  1. ThermoFlex Plus
  2. Flour sack Towel (I purchased mine at Walmart)
  3. Red-Capped Blade
  4. Iron or Heatpress

Settings on Zing Orbit with SCAL:

  1. Pressure: 50
  2. Speed: 15
  3. Overcut: 1mm
  4. Multi-cut: Off

Steps:

  1. Open or import file in SCAL
  2. Reverse design
  3. Cut design and weed
  4. Set heat press at 335 degrees and press for 17 minutes (for hand iron, refer to manufacturer’s instructions)
  5. Fold towel in half and crease mid-point using iron or heat press
  6. Lay towel flat and use crease to place center HTV
  7. Press vinyl onto towel (Use teflon sheet or towel between iron and vinyl)
  8. Remove clear backing and repeat

I am having fun getting to know my Zing Orbit. So far, one of my favorite features on the Orbit is the ability to adjust the pinch wheels. The ability to move them close enough to cut small pieces of vinyl without using a mat saves me a lot of time, and I find myself using the feature a lot.

 

Print and Cut Locket – KNK Zing Print and Cut – KNK Cutter and Jewelry – Magnetic Locket

Completed Print and Cut Locket

These little magnetic lockets are so fun and there are so many things you can do with them. I created this Print and Cut Locket using my KNK Zing and an illustration I drew. You could also use a photo, and charms can be inserted as well. I used permanent vinyl to add the word “Michigan” to the exterior glass.

Materials:

  • Magnetic Locket (Can be found at most craft stores)
  • High quality paper or printable vinyl
  • Make the Cut, or similar software
  • Red Capped Blade
  • KNK Zing (or other KNK cutter)
  • Scrap of vinyl
  • Low Adhesive Cutting Mat

Settings for KNK Zing:

  • Force – 40
  • Multicut – 1 or 2
  • Speed – 10

Steps:

Illustration for Print and Cut Locket

  • Trace your design.
  • Draw a Circle and place it on the layer below your design. Make the circle the exact size you need to fit inside the locket.
  • Size the design so that the portion you want to show fits within the circle.
  • Marquee select the two and join (ctrl j).

Create a Print and Cut Locket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Keep selected and break apart (ctrl b).

Print and Cut Locket design in a circle

 

 

 

 

 

  • Drag the original design away and delete, or move to another layer and turn off/lock.
  • Duplicate if you want the same design on the front and back sides of the locket.
  • Print out your design for a print and cut. Make sure you print the registration marks. ( I used paper for mine, but a printable vinyl would work better if you want to be able to put items in the locket without scratching the design.)
  • Now you are ready to complete your print and cut. Adhere to a not-too-sticky mat and complete the cut.
  • Carefully remove the cut circles from the mat and gently push into locket.
  • If desired, cut text for outside of locket.

Print and Cut locket with Gems

Here is the other side of the locket. I actually prefer the side without the gems, but perhaps I’ll turn it if I want to wear it with a dressy outfit sometime.