Print and Cut Locket – KNK Zing Print and Cut – KNK Cutter and Jewelry – Magnetic Locket

Completed Print and Cut Locket

These little magnetic lockets are so fun and there are so many things you can do with them. I created this Print and Cut Locket using my KNK Zing and an illustration I drew. You could also use a photo, and charms can be inserted as well. I used permanent vinyl to add the word “Michigan” to the exterior glass.

Materials:

  • Magnetic Locket (Can be found at most craft stores)
  • High quality paper or printable vinyl
  • Make the Cut, or similar software
  • Red Capped Blade
  • KNK Zing (or other KNK cutter)
  • Scrap of vinyl
  • Low Adhesive Cutting Mat

Settings for KNK Zing:

  • Force – 40
  • Multicut – 1 or 2
  • Speed – 10

Steps:

Illustration for Print and Cut Locket

  • Trace your design.
  • Draw a Circle and place it on the layer below your design. Make the circle the exact size you need to fit inside the locket.
  • Size the design so that the portion you want to show fits within the circle.
  • Marquee select the two and join (ctrl j).

Create a Print and Cut Locket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Keep selected and break apart (ctrl b).

Print and Cut Locket design in a circle

 

 

 

 

 

  • Drag the original design away and delete, or move to another layer and turn off/lock.
  • Duplicate if you want the same design on the front and back sides of the locket.
  • Print out your design for a print and cut. Make sure you print the registration marks. ( I used paper for mine, but a printable vinyl would work better if you want to be able to put items in the locket without scratching the design.)
  • Now you are ready to complete your print and cut. Adhere to a not-too-sticky mat and complete the cut.
  • Carefully remove the cut circles from the mat and gently push into locket.
  • If desired, cut text for outside of locket.

Print and Cut locket with Gems

Here is the other side of the locket. I actually prefer the side without the gems, but perhaps I’ll turn it if I want to wear it with a dressy outfit sometime.

 

Baseball card

So my son just finished his first season of high school baseball. He did pretty good. He worked hard and I’m very proud of his mindset to keep trying, no matter what. He did not give up, even coming into the season recovering from a major broken wrist and being weak from a total of 11 weeks of some sort of cast.

Boy also grew 3 inches during the season and towers over me. Anyway, the parents wanted to give the coach a gift card and a signed card from the boys so I came up with this.

Originally it looked like this, but it just looked too plain, so I added the thanks in brannonball font. Looks baseball-ish, no?

The inside was blank and all the boys signed their names and gave it to the coach. I wasn’t able to get a picture of it all signed, but it was neat to give a personal something that I created that only took minutes to make.

I used: KNK Zing, red blade. Don’t even regard my settings. I need to change my blade again so I won’t even post them.

 

Etch a Ceramic Jar with Armour Etch – Color it with Gilders Wax

I have done etching on glass a few times, but wanted to see how it would work on ceramic. A few of these cute little ceramic jars have been sitting in my craft room since I found them on clearance a few years ago. The nice smooth surface provided just the canvas I needed to try out this project.

Material:

  1. Ceramic Jar
  2. Armour Etch Cream
  3. Gilders Paste Wax
  4. Vinyl for Stencil
  5. Transfer Tape
  6. Paint Brush
  7. Protective clothing, such as rubber gloves, goggles, apron
  8. Red Capped Blade

Setting for KNK Zing:

  1. Force – 18
  2. Speed – 10
  3. Multicut – 1

Steps:

  1. Open or download design in cutter software.
  2. Load vinyl and cut stencil.
  3. Weed vinyl stencil.
  4. Apply transfer tape to vinyl, remove backing, and apply stencil to ceramic surface.
  5. Remove transfer tape.
  6. Use paint brush to apply etching cream liberally, being careful not to extend the cream beyond the edge of your stencil.
  7. Leave the cream on a few minutes. I left mine on about 3 minutes.
  8. Clean off thoroughly under running water.
  9. Peel off stencil and dry completely.the
  10. Use a rag to apply Gilders Wax to etched surface. Continue rubbing to remove from non-etched area. (The wax sets quickly, so I had best luck by removing excess wax as soon as possible. It can be removed later, but takes a lot more effort.)

    I left the stencil in place while applying some of the wax, but it is not necessary.

I realized after I started the project that it was not a good idea to plan a two-color project where the two colors were directly adjacent to each other. It was very difficult to apply the end of the “green” stem within the red cherry portion of the design,

I also attempted this on a ceramic tile. It worked, but I wasn’t happy with the end result. The entire tile apparently was a little porous as I was not able to completely remove the excess wax from the surface of the tile. This might be remedied by leaving the stencil in place while applying the Gilders Wax. I may have to give it another try.

 

 

DIY Decorated Cloth Napkins with Inkjet Heat Transfer – KNK Print and Cut

It’s fun to use DIY decorated cloth napkins for those special occasion dinners. In fact, why not use them everyday and save the cost and waste of paper napkins! For this project I used inexpensive cloth napkins which I found at Walmart. An inkjet transfer is used to add the design.

Cloth Napkins with HTV

Materials:

  1. Cloth napkins
  2. Inkjet transfers (I used Jet Pro Soft Stretch)
  3. Make the Cut Software
  4. Red Capped Blade
  5. Heat Press or Iron

Settings for KNK Zing:

  1. Force – 40
  2. Speed – 10
  3. Multi-Cut – 2

Steps:

  1. Import Pixel Trace  Import Pixel Trace
  2. Mirror Image
  3. Print out image. (Follow instructions in MTC manual if not sure how to complete Print and Cut.)
  4. Cut, using Print and Cut.
  5. Iron napkin and fold so that the surface that is exposed will be the portion you want to apply the image to. Press again while folded. (I used a 13 X 13 inch napkin and folded in eighths.) Fold and Iron Napkin
  6. Place image face down on napkin. Place Inkjet Transfer Face Down
  7. Check instructions for the Inkjet Transfer. (For Jet Pro Soft Stretch and heat press, set at 350 degrees and press for 25 seconds.)
  8. Carefully peel paper off napkin.

Two Upper Peninsula Napkins

 

Anyone from Northern Michigan understands the pride felt by those that are “born and bred” in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Since my husband and I were not born in the U.P., we are not considered “Yoopers” by the locals. However, we do enjoy the benefits of living in this beautiful part of the country, and the design I used embraces our “transplant” status.

 

Perfect Applique Pieces

Since my post last month about learning to use the Zing to cut fabric applique pieces, I’ve been using both the Zing and Force to practice and learn more about that.  The most important piece of information that I can share with you is that you MUST have a sharp blade to get clean cuts!!!  I struggled for a long time one day and was getting very frustrated trying to cut some fabric pieces until I used a new blade.  What a difference that one thing made!  And, yes, I can see exactly what pieces I cut by the markings on my mat since I neglected to reduce the blade settings when I put in the new fabric blade.

This is a picture of the finished applique on the back of my shirt jacket.  Isn’t he a cute little guy?  Actually he measures just a bit over 7″ square.

optimized-pug

Materials Used:

Quilting weight cotton fabrics with Steam-A-Seam Lite fused to the wrong side.

Settings:

Machine used: KNK Force, blade: Fabric, Blade Tension: 2.5, Passes: 1, Starting/Ending Depth: 10, Cut Speed: 25, Blade Offset: .75, Overcut: .5

Information/Instructions:

The embroidery design is from an Anita Goodesign collection “Casual Friday” that will be released in December.  I am fortunate to work at a store that gets previews of soon to be released designs.

In order to prepare the applique piece cutting files, I open the design in my Viking Premier+ software and manually trace the applique piece shapes.  Then I export those shapes as SVG files.  The shapes are imported into Make The Cut and cut directly to the Zing or exported as SVG files to be used on the Force.  That description makes it sound as if it is a complicated and involved process but after the first couple of times it really goes quite quickly and since I have a background in computer programming, I enjoy doing it.

Here is a screen shot of the applique pieces as they appear in MTC.  As you can see from the picture, a lot of the fabric is overstitched with threads in the embroidery process.

optimized-pieces In order to introduce the store customers to the “cool” way to create perfect applique pieces, I am teaching two classes this week in which they will be making an embroidered pot holder with pre-cut pieces.  They will prepare their fabrics ahead of time by fusing Steam-A-Seam Lite onto the wrong side.  During class, we will cut the applique pieces for them to use in their embroidery using the Zing.

This is what they will be making.
optimized-skillet   And these are the pieces we will be cutting.

optimized-skillet-pieces