Upcycle a Vintage Window – Create a One-of-a-Kind Piece for Your Home

Photo of upcycled old window with sailboat on itIt’s easy to upcycle a vintage window with some intermediate vinyl and a simple design.

While these vinyled windows may not be quite the trend they were a couple of years ago, they still look amazing with the ever popular farmhouse decor.

For my two most recent vintage window projects, I chose windows that have 6 panes, but any old window with a wooden sash will do. Please keep in mind that many old windows have lead paint. Because of this, you will want to take care of anything that might be chipping off. Sometimes I am able to leave the windows as I find them, and other times they need a bit of work.

The sash for my sailboat window didn’t really have any paint left on it, and I liked it just as it was. Hubby did spray the wood for me with a clear lacquer, just to make it a little easier to keep clean. However, you really wouldn’t have to even do that.

Capture of design software window layout

When using windows with several panes, it is easiest to divide your design before you cut it. I prefer to draw up the window in my design software before I do any cutting. By doing this, I am able to lay the image out so that I know exactly where the muntins (the pieces of wood that divide the panes of glass) will cross my design. That way, I can put cut lines there, making the large vinyl design easier to manage and lay out on the window after cutting.

Materials:

Settings for Zing Orbit and MTC:

  • Force – 23
  • Speed – 10
  • Multicut – 1

Photo of upcycled old window with Easter Quote

Steps:

  • Clean and refurbish sash of window as needed.
  • Clean glass. Use a razor blade to clean up any old paint drips, etc. from glass.
  • If needed, lay out design on drawing of window as shown above. This will not be necessary in all cases. Put cut lines where required in design.
  • Cut and weed design. Apply transfer tape.
  • If you have a large self-healing cutting mat, it is useful to lay that out on your work table and place your window on top of it. This way you can use the lines of the mat to line up your design as you place it on the window. (Just make sure you have the window aligned carefully with the line of the mat before you begin laying out your vinyl.)
  • Place your vinyl carefully on the glass. In some cases, you might have vinyl that comes up to an inside corner of crossed muntins. (In the case of the sailboat design, you’ll see that I did not have this issue, as the design did not cross any corners. You may want to consider this issue when you choose your design.) If so, work your vinyl carefully into the corner and up the wooden muntins.
  • You may need to slice the vinyl from the outside corner in slightly to be able to work the vinyl into the corner. Use your squeegee to get any air bubbles out, working from the middle of the vinyl outward. Snug vinyl up to muntin and use an xacto knife and straight edge to careful trim any vinyl at the edge of the muntin.
  • Continue┬áin this way until your design is complete.
  • Now, display your vintage window work of art for all to admire!

 

 

3D Thanksgiving Card – 3D Card with KNK Zing – Card with Acetate Window

3D Thanksgiving CardI make floating Christmas ornaments to sell in craft shows and through a local shop. To make the inside, I adhere a vinyl design to a piece of acetate (overhead transparency). I decided it would be fun to make a greeting card using the same process. This time though, I used 3 sheets of transparency and placed portions of the design on each. By creating it in this way, it gave it a 3D effect.

Materials:

  1. Intermediate Vinyl
  2. Mylar, acetate, or other transparent plastic sheet
  3. White Cardstock
  4. Scrapbook Tape
  5. 3M (or similar) foam tape
  6. Red Capped Blade
  7. Zing Orbit

Machine Settings for Zing Orbit and Scal:

  1. Cutting Card stock: Pressure – 56, Speed – 12, Multi-Cut – 2
  2. Cutting Vinyl – Pressure – 50, Speed – 16, Multi-Cut – Off
  3. Cutting Transparency – I cut this on my original Zing with MTC: Force 120, Speed 11, Multi-cut – 3

Steps:

  1. If you want to have something printed on the card, do that first. If you plan to use PNC, make sure to print your registration marks. Of course, it would be fine to simply cut by hand as well.
  2. Cut the card stock window panes. For this I first cut a 5″ X 7″ rectangle, then 4 smaller rectangles from that.
  3. Cut 3 pieces of transparency. You’ll need them to be just a little smaller than your card size, but big enough so the edges will be under the window frame. Leave enough room along the edge for scrapbook tape to stick to the edges. (See
  4. Cut out the vinyl for your design. Decide which portions need to be in the background, and which in the foreground.
  5. Adhere vinyl to transparencies. Stack them carefully on the card, and on each 3D Thanksgiving Cardother, as you build your design so that you are lining things up properly.
  6. Use small pieces of foam tape between transparencies, hidden under the vinyl, to build up the design and hold it together.
  7. Stick the double-sided tape to the backside outer edges of the window frame. Carefully adhere to your card, being sure to line up carefully. If you have cut your transparencies small enough, this should hold all pieces together.

I am pretty happy with how this turned out. It might be easier next time to cut the window panes out of the front of the card. This way I could place the transparencies behind the cut-out. I would then need to line the card (or just the back side of the card front) to enclose the layers.