amaZING!!

Today I had my first experience using a KNK Zing Air.  It is an amazing little machine!!  Recently there has been a surge of interest in using electronic cutters to cut fabric pieces for applique both for people who do hand applique and those who applique by machine.  The shop where I work has decided that the KNK Zing Air is the best cutter for the job.  (I might have had a bit of influence in the decision 🙂 ).  Friday two Zing Air cutters arrived at the shop.  Today (Sunday) one of them is helping me prepare my post.

A friend who works with us at the shop had a request to create an applique for a wall hanging she wants to create.  She explained her plan to me and provided a copy of a photo that was her inspiration.  I was able to use an existing file from the Make The Cut Gallery and node edit it so it resembled the photos.

Materials Used:

Cotton Quilting Fabric backed with Heat-N-Bond

Cotton Quilting Fabric backed with Steam-A-Seam Lite 2

Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl

Settings:

Machine Used:  KNK Zing Air

For Cotton Fabrics: Fabric blade, Speeds 11/15, Force 75, Multi 2, Offset .75, PIN 25

For Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl:  Red blade, Speeds 15/15, Force 30, Multi 1, Offset .25, PIN 25

optimized-skulls

Okay, skulls are not my thing, but—.  The request was for a 4″ high skull cut from fabric so it could be appliqued onto a base fabric.  The green one in the picture is about 3.5″ high because I forgot that the measurements in the bar in MTC also include the vector handles.  So I corrected the size before cutting the others.  The green one has Heat-N-Bond fused to the back of the fabric.  The two pieces did not get cut cleanly apart because the Zing mat was not sticky enough to hold the fabric in place while cutting.  The white one has Steam-A-Seam Lite 2 fused to the back of the fabric and the Steam-A-Seam itself is sticky so that stickiness, in addition to the adhesive on the mat, was successful in holding the fabric in place for a clean cut.  After seeing the amount of detail that would have to be dealt with in using this design for an applique, I thought that the Iron-on Heat Transfer Vinyl would be a better choice for the applique and it would not have to be stitched down.  The black glittery skull was cut from this vinyl.  And I did remember to mirror the image before cutting the vinyl since it is cut from the back side.

So now I know a little about the Zing and will be able to help customers as they expand their skills into our world of Klic-N-Kut.

Patchwork Valentine

One of the many things that I enjoy about  my 15″ KNK Maxx Air and the KNK Studio and Make the Cut software is that I can use them in combination with my other hobbies.  For my post today, I combined some sewing techniques with the capabilities of the KNK cutter and software. I created a Valentine card with a fabric patchwork heart and vinyl lettering on the front. CardFront-Optimized And a printed message on the inside. CardInside-Optimized Materials Used:

Five cotton quilting fabrics with Valentine prints

Muslin fabric

Steam-A-Seam 2 fusible web

Cardstock:  White, pink, dark chocolate brown

1/4″ Double sided adhesive tape

Fabri-Tac adhesive

Battilizer batting

Sheer Mesh cut away stabilizer

Various Embroidery threads for decorative stitching

Aleen’s Okay To Wash-It Adhesive

Settings:

Machine:  15″ KNK Maxx Air

Blades:  Fabric and Red Cap (standard materials)

Force:  Fabrics – 70, Cardstocks – 50 – 75, Vinyl – 13

Speed: 80 – 100

Instructions:

I began by tracing a heart shape I like and sizing to the dimensions I wanted for my finished patchwork heart in KNK Studio.  I then used the Ginsu Knife function to cut the heart shape into 5 pieces.  A copy of the uncut heart shape was resized to a smaller heart for the “backing heart” and a larger heart for the “background heart” using the Transform/Outline function.

Before cutting the fabrics for the heart pieces, the fabrics were pressed and the Steam-A-Seam 2 fused to the wrong side of the fabric.  The second piece of protective paper was removed from the Steam-A-Seam 2 and the wrong side of the fabric brayered to a very sticky mat for cutting.  The outer pieces of the patchwork heart had been enlarged on the outer edge to provide additional fabric for wrapping to the back.

Once the heart pieces were cut, they were assembled into a heart shape and fused to a piece of muslin.  To prepare the heart for decorative stitching, the fused pieced heart was layered on top of the Battilizer batting and the Sheer Mesh cut away stabilizer placed on the bottom of the stack. PiecesForStitching-Optimized Decorative stitches were selected and sewn over the “seams” in the patchwork heart. DecorativeStitching-Optimized The “backing heart” (smaller solid heart) was cut from white cardstock.  The backing heart was centered on the wrong side of the pieced and stitched heart.  The outline of the backing heart was traced on the sheet mesh stabilizer.  Small scissors were used to trim the stabilizer and batting on the marked line.  It was necessary to remove some of the decorative stitching to be able to trim the stabilizer and batting.  The “Okay To Wash-It” adhesive was used on the bobbin threads of the decorative stitches just inside the marked line to keep them from unraveling when the stitches outside of the line were trimmed.  “Fabric-Tac” adhesive was used to glue the backing heart to the wrong side of the heart unit. ReadyForFolding-Optimized Fabric-Tac was used to glue the fabric edge to the backing heart as the fabric was folded to the back. FoldedAndGlued-Optimized FinishedHeart-Optimized A “background heart” (larger solid heart) was cut from the brown cardstock.  The background heart was centered behind the completed patchwork heart and attached using double sided tape.

The card shown at the beginning of this post was created by folding an 8 1/2″ x 11″ piece of pink cardstock in half to form a top fold card.  The assembled patchwork heart and background heart were attached to the left side of the front of the card with double sided tape.  The words “Your Love” were cut from brown vinyl and placed on the right side of the front of the card.  The message for the inside of the card was printed using Microsoft Word and attached to the fold on the inside of the card with Fabri-Tac adhesive.  The font used for the card is Hancock.

Use the links below to download files for creating this card.  Enjoy!

Patchwork Valentine Cut Files_JudyKay

Iron-on Flock from KNK USA

Iron-on Flock is an amazing heat transfer vinyl that gives your project the look and feel of a rich, soft velvet. This particular vinyl product can be adhered to many fabrics including those with stretch characteristics like Lycra and Spandex. It has a very luxurious and long-lasting feel, and comes in many beautiful colors.

Iron-onFlockColorsWide

Like most iron-on vinyl, Iron-on Flock must be cut in reverse. To do this, reverse (flip) your design in the digital cutting software. Place the glossy side down on the mat, and cut on the dull side.

Cutting Iron-on Flock requires a thick materials (60°, blue cap) blade and a high pressure setting. Multiple passes will likely be required. Make test cuts to ensure proper settings for blade exposure, speed and force.

Iron-on Flock example

Iron-on Flock should be applied with a heat setting of 320-340° Fahrenheit for 10-15 seconds, using medium to firm pressure. Use a Teflon sheet to prevent damage to the design. The glossy carrier sheet should be peeled off when the vinyl is cooled. If the vinyl starts to come off with the carrier, simply increase pressure and reapply heat.Iron-on Flock Close-up

Unlike other heat transfer products, Iron-on Flock finished products can be washed and dried at medium temperatures.

Boxes are a Treat!

Holidays bring to mind many kinds of treats.  My creative friend, Cherrie, has partnered with her KNK Maxx to create 2 different boxes for giving food treats.  She embroidered kitchen towels with recipes for different chocolate treats, made the treats and fabric covered boxes to present the treats and towels as unique and special gifts.  The files for the boxes were created in the KNK Studio software.

TowelswTruffles&Boxes-Optimized

Pie Box-Optimized

Materials Used:

Poster Board

Various Cotton Quilting weight fabrics

HeatNBond Ultrahold iron-on adhesive

Self adhesive Velcro dots – 1/2″ diameter

Office Supply clear plastic report cover

Vinyl for lettering on pie box

Liquid glue such as Crafter’s Pick The Ultimate

 

Settings:

15″ KNK Maxx

To cut Poster Board:  Thick Materials Blade (blue cap), V=200, F=100 1 pass

To cut Fabrics:  Fabric Blade, V=400, F=120  2 passes

To cut Vinyl:  Red Blade, V=200, F=50  1 pass

Instructions:

Score and cut the box shape from the poster board.

Prepare a piece of fabric 2″ larger than dimensions of cut poster board shape.

Adhere HeatNBond Ultrahold iron-on adhesive to wrong side of fabric piece following directions that accompany the adhesive.

Remove paper backing from fabric/adhesive piece and place adhesive side down on a

very sticky mat.

Cut fabric using the same file as for the poster board.

Align the cut fabric and poster board pieces and adhere together following the direction included with the HeatNBond Ultrahold.

This picture shows the cut poster board and fabric pieces for a Truffle Box.  The word “Truffles” is also cut from fabric and will be adhered to the box lid by ironing after the fabric has been ironed to the poster board.  The cut fabric pieces have been placed on the HeatNBond backing sheet to preserve the adhesive until the box parts are assembled.

Box Parts-Optimized

Fold box on score lines with tabs to inside.  Glue tabs in place with liquid glue.

Add  self adhesive Velcro dot to hold lid flap closed.

For pie box, use poster board settings to cut the clear insert from an office supply report cover.  Place clear insert between poster board and fabric when adhering fabric to poster board.  NOTE:  Plastic insert will melt if touched with iron.  Use vinyl for the lettering on the pie box.

Click on the following link for the box files generously shared by Cherrie.

CutFiles CM Boxes

 

 

 

 

 

Cut Fabrics for OESD’S Haunted House with the Klic-N-Kut

HHouse1

Use your Make-The-Cut software and Klic-N-Kut cutters to cut the fabrics for OESD’s Haunted House. The house is comprised of 15 separate pieces that are made up of freestanding lace and applique.  The finished size measures 8.5″ tall  and has a footprint of 6″ x 6″.  The hole in the bottom is sized for a tea light to project light in its windows.

 Materials:

  • Purple, Black, Light & Dark Grey Polyester Satin or Dupioni Silk
  • Yellow/Gold Polyester or Silk Organza
  • Black Isacord Embroidery Thread
  • OESD Black Medium Weight Tear-Away Embroidery Stabilizer was used for Satin or Silk
  • OESD Stabil-Stick Tear-Away used for Organza
  • Steam-A-Seam 2 Double Stick Fusible Web
  • 505 Temporary Adhesive Spray
  • Water-Soluble Stabilizer or Film Water Soluble Stabilizer

Tools:

Settings:

  • Maxx Air:  Force = 50; Offset = .75; Speed = 150; Passes = 1; Blade Height =25
  • Zing!:  Force = 65-90; Offset = .75; Speed = 9/10; Passes = 1-2; Blade Height = 25

 Method:

  1. Each piece of the haunted house, when stitched out, is a combination of lace and fabric appliqué.  The first step is to make the fabric appliqué shapes that will be cut on the KNK and included in the design. Steps, using my Bernina Artista V6 software, are available as a PDF.  If you have a different software, hopefully my process will be an inspiration of what might be possible with your software also.
  2. Prepare fabrics for cutting
    1. Iron the Steam-A-Seam 2 to one side of the Black Stabilizer
    2. Remove the Steam-A-Seam 2 paper from the Black Stabilizer – this will leave one side of the Black Stabilizer sticky
    3. Iron the sticky side of the Black Stabilizer to the wrong side of the fabric
    4. Your fabric is now prepared for cutting
  3. Cut fabrics into appliqué shapes
    1. The cutting mat needs to be very sticky
    2. Place the fabric on the cutting mat with the Black Stabilizer side next to the mat and the fabric facing up
    3. Fabric is now ready for placement in the embroidery as an appliqué
  4. Embroidery steps
    1. Hoop the embroidery hoop with Water-Soluble Stabilizer or Film Water Soluble Stabilizer
    2. Fill the bobbin with the same thread that you are using in the needle
    3. Begin embroidering on the hooped Water-Soluble Stabilizer.
    4. The embroidery machine will automatically stop for the addition of an appliqué fabric shape
    5. Spray the Black Stabilizer side of the fabric with the 505 Temporary Adhesive
    6. Place the Black Stabilizer side of the fabric in the designated place in the embroidery design and continue sewing.  

Repeat the above steps for each piece in the design.  When complete, follow the directions in the pattern for washing away the Water-Soluble stabilizer, drying and assembling them into a haunted house.

This is a fun project, especially because the KNK Maxx Air and Zing cut all my fabric pieces perfectly to the size required by the embroidery design.  Being able to cut my applique shapes to the exact size needed with my KNK cutters has revolutionized the accuracy of my applique embroidery on the embroidery machine. 

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