Fabric Flower Embellishments

It is Spring in Florida and the flowers are starting to bloom. If you are still dealing with old man winter, make some of these colorful fabric flower embellishments to brighten your world!

Fabric flowers can be used on headbands, attached to a pin for a fun brooch or added to a quilt for some 3D effects. Make a bunch attached to floral stems and put in a vase for a perky permanent bouquet.

Materials

  • Fabric scraps large enough for your chosen flower petals. Chose two colors for each petal. For my flowers the scraps were 5” square
  • Heat and Bond Ultra (heavy weight) fusible
  • Button or gem for flower center
  • Fabric glue
  • Flower SVG that has different size petals. You can download my Blooming Flowers for free here! Blooming Flowers

Maxx Air Settings

Force = 130, Speed = 200, Passes = 2, Blade Offset = .25, Blade Height = 25

Process Details

  • Cut out fabric squares large enough for your chosen petal size. You will need two squares for each petal. Mix up the colors for a fun funky look.
  • Cut one 5” square of the Heat and Bond Ultra for every petal.
  • Fuse the Heat and Bond Ultra to the wrong side of one fabric square per petal.
  • Peel off the paper backing and lay another fabric square over the first one wrong side down. Fuse. Your fabric square should have the right sides (the pretty sides) showing on each side.
  • Adhere to a very sticky mat, you don’t want the fabric to move around when cutting.
  • Insert your fabric blade and cut out the petals.
  • Stack up the petals, offsetting each one slightly to get a full look to your flower.
  • Sew a button in the center through all layers. Or just glue a gem in the center.
  • Cup the flower in your hand to curl up the petals to shape them. You can curl or scrunch up any petals to give the flower a more 3D appearance.
  • Glue the leaves to the back of the flower with fabric glue.

 

Now you have some pretty fabric flowers to use as a cute embellishment. Something bright and cheery to chase away any winter blues!

 

 

Waste Not, Want Not. Stretching Your Vinyl Stash!

 

Tired of wasting vinyl when working on word signs that use multiple colors? You could ignore the format and cut each color to use the smallest piece possible but trying to get it correctly lined up can be a pain. So many of us just chalk up the waste as an unfortunate by-product of our craft. However, if you plan carefully you can minimize the waste and still get great alignment.

I made this logo sign for a friend to put in her vendor booth for a trade show. The logo is two colors, the bulk of the lettering is black and the word “Passion” and two small diamonds are purple.

By creating multiple weeding rectangles to surround each word instead of one big square, a large useable rectangle of vinyl was saved for another project. The purple portions of the vinyl sign did not need to be formatted so weeding rectangles fit to size were used and the words were easily placed on the leather after the black vinyl was heat pressed.

Materials

Leather for sign

Siser EasyWeed Extra heat transfer vinyl (for leather)

KNK Zing/Zing Air/Maxx Air Standard Material Detail Blade

Maxx Air Settings

Force = 43, Speed = 210, Blade Offset = .25, Passes = 1, Blade Height = 25

Process Details

Set up sign in cutting program separating the colors to different layers. Cut each color vinyl, reversing (mirror) for the heat transfer vinyl.

When weeding, preserve any large areas of un-used vinyl by cutting out and setting aside for future use.

Heat press to the leather one color at a time. I did the black letters first and then lined up the purple by eye and pressed. Press for the time and temperature recommended by the manufacturer.

Closing

Careful planning can create less waste and maximize your vinyl stash, so you can make more fun stuff!

Custom Sized Boxes in a Hurry

Need a custom box in a hurry and don’t have the time to design one yourself? There are hundreds of free box templates on the internet, but if you need an odd size you may have to stretch and tweak so much, you might as well draw it yourself. Fortunately, there is a free box design tool called Template Maker. Template Maker is an online tool for making all kinds of boxes. Sandy McCauley made an awesome video on how the Template Maker works, which is how found this tool for my toolbox. Sandy McCauley Template Maker Video

I recently started a new business venture with a laser cutting machine, making custom products I cannot cut with my KNK Maxx. And while it certainly could cut paper for boxes, I did not purchase the Print and Cut upgrade for it (major big bucks!) I wanted a nice presentation box to hold this product for shipping. So, my KNK Maxx Air is far from retired, but is a valuable partner in my business.

I started with the dimensions I needed to hold fifty units of the product and used the Template Maker tool to design the box. One of your options is to download the result as an SVG. Since you are working with a SVG file you can use any cutting design program on the market to customize and cut your box.

I added my logo and text to describe the contents of the box, positioning these objects within the fold lines of the box. Next, I set up the file as a Print and Cut and moved the print, emboss and cut lines to different layers so they could be executed in turn.

After printing on cardstock and mounting to the mat, my first process was to emboss the score or fold lines using the Embossing Tool. Switched to the Standard Material Blade to cut out my box, once again using the Print and Cut operation.

Using a creasing tool while folding the sides and glue flaps of your box helps keep the box rigid. I did notice that the glue flaps were a little bit small and I will increase those in my cutting software next time. Apply glue to the appropriate flaps and form your box.

My custom product fits perfectly and will help protect the contents during shipping.

My Maxx Air allowed me to create a professional presentation of the completed custom job for my client! Be it business or pleasure we all need unique custom sized boxes occasionally. Having our KNK cutters makes the task easy!

 

Materials

KNK Zing/Zing Air/Maxx Air Standard Material Detail Blade

Embossing Tool

Cardstock

Paper Glue

 

Glass Etching Frosted Treat Jars

Small gifts for friends and family are on every Christmas crafting list this time of year. Try this easy glass etching project for a gift that is sure to impress!

I found some small jars at the Dollar Tree store (every crafters’ favorite place!) perfect for holding candy or other small treats. Decided to etch designs into the glass and add a chalkboard vinyl label so that after the original contents are gone, the label could be changed easily.

Materials

Glass jars – Dollar Tree Classic Storage Jars

Armour Etch – glass etching cream

Circut Chalkboard Vinyl

KNK Zing/Zing Air/Maxx Air Standard Material Detail Blade

Craft Vinyl

White chalk pen or Uniball Signo Broad gel pen

Painter tape and plastic gloves

Maxx Air Settings

Craft Vinyl settings – Standard Material Blade, Force = 42, Speed = 200, Passes = 1, Blade Offset = .25, Blade Height = 25

Pen settings – Force = 10, Speed = 250, Passes = 1, Offset = Disabled, Pen Height = 25

Chalkboard Vinyl Settings – Force = 55, Speed = 300, Passes = 2, Blade Offset = .25, Blade Height = 25

Process Details

Measure the area of the jar you want to etch and create a design mask to cut out of the craft vinyl. Cut and weed the vinyl mask and apply to the jar. Tape off any areas of the jar that you do not want to etch with the painter’s tape.

Apply a generous coat of the Armour Etch over your vinyl mask. Wear gloves and protect surfaces as this stuff is very caustic! Let it sit for at least 15 minutes. Remove any excess etching crème and return it to the jar (it is re-useable!). Wash off remaining cream with water. Remove your mask and wash again with dish soap. Dry thoroughly.

Set up your label design with a writing layer and a cutting layer. Close the cutting layer and insert your pen in the blade holder, send to cutter with the WYSIWYG option.

Remove pen and insert blade. Close the writing layer and open the cut layer. Send to cutting machine with the WYSIWYG option.

Wait a few minutes before weeding to allow the writing to dry properly. Weed the labels and apply to the jars.

Now fill up with gifts or sweet treats and you have a gift that is sure to please!

 

Deco FILM® Paint FX


Cool weather is finally arriving in Florida and I wanted to embellish a long sleeve t-shirt for Thanksgiving Day. Finding fall colors this time of year is nearly impossible, everything is already Christmas in the stores! I did snag a lovely purple top and wanted something shimmery but not too sparkly for my design. Deco FILM® Paint FX was perfect! This heat transfer vinyl comes in six beautiful metallic colors. The effect is a soft shimmer. And it is thinner than regular HTV molding to the fabric, so the designs look screen painted rather than laying on the surface. Wish it came in all the colors!

Materials

Deco FILM® Paint FX  I used the Champagne color.

T-shirt

Maxx Air Settings

KNK Zing/Zing Air/Maxx Air Standard Material Detail Blade

Force = 42, Speed = 200, Blade Offset = .25, Blade Height = 25

Process Details

This vinyl cuts just like every other heat transfer vinyl, minimal blade exposure, mirror the design, weed the negative and carrier side adhered to the mat. The weeding was super easy, comes up cleanly and with little effort.

Heat press with a firm pressure at 310°F – 330°F for 17 to 20 seconds. Then remove carrier sheet while warm, and with a Teflon® or parchment paper covering the design, repress for 2 seconds.

Deco FILM® Paint FX is a great alternative to the glitter metallic heat transfer vinyl products, for when you want a subtler shimmer and shine. Love it!