Create your own cake stencils

Hello fellow KNK friends! I’m thrilled that Sandy has asked me to guest blog once again. I just LOVE all the ways I can use my KNK with my many craft addictions interests. I like to dabble in scrapbooking, sewing, embroidery, and decorating cakes. The KNK is so versatile I’ve used it with each of these endeavors.

I have a great time planning big blow out themed parties for my kids. Be forewarned if you start big you will feel as if you must top yourself each year which will result in you pulling out your hair and the inevitable sleepless night the day before the party. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

My daughter declared she wanted a fashion / beauty theme for her 8th birthday this year so I scoured pinterest, yes I’m still obsessed, and came up with a Breakfast at Tiffany’s theme. I love to use each birthday or celebration as an opportunity to play with new techniques for cakes and I wanted to finally tackle stenciling a cake.

The entire cake is edible other than the ring. The box started to "melt" a bit. Better luck next time.

If you’ve ever wondered why those beautiful cakes cost so much money let me tell you I now know why. Hours and hours are spent creating them and supplies are expensive. I had admired a cake sometime last year that had used stenciling, so off to my favorite cake supply website to buy some stencils. Wow those things can cost $20 or more for one stencil!  I just knew my trusty KNK wouldn’t let me down. I figured I could do that myself and the best part is….  for much cheaper.

Make sure you are using food safe products whenever working with anything you might eat. I found a 10 pack of food safe stencil sheets for $10!  I can make 10-20 stencils out of them. I like the idea of $0.50 – $1.00 per stencil instead of $20 or more.

I found a flourish font on dafont.com called “Floralia” and modified one of the dingbats into a damask looking stencil which you can download here. I created a rectangle around the design and at the top left I used the built-in circle shape and welded the two together to give myself a tab to pull off the stencil more easily.  The file should be below for your personal use.

The internet is a great source and I love youtube and Cakecentral when trying to learn a new cake technique. I was nervous with a white cake and black royal icing that this could be a “royal” disaster.

I placed a very light coating of shortening on the stencil to help it adhere solidly to the cake. Then you take your spatula and coat over the stencil with your royal icing. Take a bench scraper tool and scrape off the excess. You have to be careful with this step. I had to go back over some spots because I scraped too much off. You want it to be an even layer for the best appearance. Then while you hold your breath and pray (yes those steps are necessary) you slowly pull the stencil away from the cake. I was so pleased with how much easier it was than I had thought it would be. Make sure to clean off your stencil between each side of the cake or better yet, cut more than one since the materials are so cheap.

 

Imagine all the possibilities, the sky really is the limit to what type of stencils you could create. Is your handwriting horrible like mine? Create a stencil with the wording you’d like to use and stencil it on your cake instead. You could also airbrush a design using these stencils if you have a cake airbrush set.

A quick note on cutting the material. I had actually sent it to Michelle Hessler to see if the Zing would cut out this material (still planning on a new machine before the end of the year). She had the following tips to share.

“You need to cut it in two passes because the glossy side is harder, and you can get through the soft side easy, but since the harder side cuts through last (lays on the mat) you need the second pass to guarantee it will cut through at all points. It cuts really well, and doesn’t use a lot of pressure at all.

I also didn’t let my pinch wheels go over the material at all. My mat is good and sticky, and so I just made sure it was applied on that well. I didn’t want the wheels on the material, because they have some adhesive on them, and I didn’t want that to touch the food safe side of the stencil.”

Thanks Michelle for all your help with this project.

Thanks for letting me stop by again and share my obsession joy of creating with my KNK.

I hope to begin posting more details on how to throw your own Breakfast at Tiffany’s themed party in the next couple weeks on my blog.  Hopefully I’ll see you there.

Jen L

www.cutebugdesigns.com

29 thoughts on “Create your own cake stencils

  1. This is awesome! Can you direct us to where you bought the cake stencil material? I would love to try this one! We do some amatuer cake decorating here (afterall my last name is Baker 🙂 !
    love hugs and prayers
    Carol

    • I have a rule. I NEVER cut into the cakes I make. It’s just to painful to do it. LOL I make my hubby do it instead.

      • LOL….good idea!! It would be too painful to cut into it after so much work went into planning, designing and then constructing it! Take pictures, set the knife down and walk away. 😉

  2. I forgot to ask, what kind of frosting did you use for the black design? Its hard to mix a good black shade. Thanks!
    love hugs and prayers
    Carol

    • I bought the CK royal icing mix and while making I added cocoa in to darken it first. Then I added americolor black gel icing. I was nervous about getting a good black color as well and I believe the trick of adding the cocoa helped a lot.

  3. If this cake tasted as good as it looks (and I’m SURE it did!), I know it didn’t last long! I’m so impressed. I would have had that black icing everywhere but yours looks perfect. Thanks for sharing!

    • Thanks it was yummy if I do say so myself. We refer to that as the “week of cake”. I worked out even harder that week in order to eat those leftovers, lol.

  4. WOW!! This is fabulous!! I’m going to share this with my son and DIL, who are both chefs, and both Zing users 🙂

  5. Impressive and courageous! I would have been terrified of putting a black stencil on a white cake, too – so much that could go wrong. But everything turned out beautifully!

  6. Thanks everyone for the compliments. I love doing new cakes to try out new techniques. Each one is a new challenge. Glad I could share with you all.

  7. Great project, Jen, and great use of your KNK. I have taken two cake decorating classes and know exactly how costly stuff can be when making cakes. Even more so with time-consuming.
    You did a fantastic job on your daughter’s cake. Well done.

  8. This is so good. I sure wish I had something like this when I used to do cake decorating!

  9. I have wanted to try and do fancy cakes and cookies for awhile, but it seemed so involved–this is terrific! Thanks for sharing this.

  10. You did a beautiful job! As a professional cake decorator, I would like to thank you for pointing out why they are so expensive. The supplies are insanely expensive, and if you can find ways to save, such as making your own stencils, there is still a very large time investment. So many blogs and articles degrade professionals due to the cost, instruct how to decorate a cake like its easy as pie, and show a less than stellar example of their efforts, then act like they are the new Ron Ben Israel! 

  11. Beautiful cake very talented what type of material did you use to make the stencils I’m worried about buying the wrong sheets

  12. Every day I am more impressed with the talents of my daughter. What a gift from God she is. I must say from first-hand experience, that her cakes taste as good as they look, which is: Amazing!

  13. This page was one of the first that popped up when I did my search! I have a zing and my daughter-in-law makes cakes. She asked if my “cool” machine (it IS cool!) could do this. So happy you posted! Do you have any suggestions for blade, force etc? I’m thinking blue blade, two passes? Slow speed? Did you use a spacer? Thanks!!!

    • Hi Jane, Originally Michelle cut this for me and she didn’t notate her settings. I have my new Groove E machine and I’ve cut it out since but also didn’t notate my settings. I did not use a spacer, however I do use the credit card trick and have my blade sitting up a bit. I did have the speed on the slower side and definitely two passes as it has a bit of a glossy side. The material is thinner than traditional cake stencils so you need to be careful with more intricate designs when using it on your cake. I did use the normal blade when cutting. Good luck =)

  14. Hi Jane, Originally Michelle cut this for me and she didn’t notate her settings. I have my new Groove E machine and I’ve cut it out since but also didn’t notate my settings. I did not use a spacer, however I do use the credit card trick and have my blade sitting up a bit. I did have the speed on the slower side and definitely two passes as it has a bit of a glossy side. The material is thinner than traditional cake stencils so you need to be careful with more intricate designs when using it on your cake. I did use the normal blade when cutting. Good luck =)

Comments are closed.