About Cuttin' with KNK (Michele)

I am the proud mother of 2 grown children, waiting for grandchildren some day. I've been married to my best friend since 1988. I have been crafting since I was a girl - I can't even remember a time when I wasn't creating something, and I've tried nearly everything. I discovered KNK in 2009 and have loved the company and its products ever since. The machines are so versatile and enhance my own creativity. It is rare that I make something without my KNKs.

Fabric Tissue Box Cover – No Sew!

I received an email recently for a Cartonnage class – I hadn’t a clue what that meant so I googled it. During my perusal of the Google results, I saw these cute tissue box covers made from paper and decided to adapt them for a project that hadn’t been getting any steam. It was perfect timing! I wanted to make my daughter something both useful and nice with some fat quarters of fabric she picked out. This was just the inspiration I needed!

First, I created my design file in MTC. I made it for paper (hence the fold lines), but cut it from fabric.

I want the fabric to hold its shape, so I ironed a heavyweight fusible Pellon stabilizer to the back before cutting. Cutting was so easy! I ran three test cuts to make sure it was going all the way through the fabric and the stabilizer and then I was cutting away!

I learned to put the fabric side down on my sticky mat when the stabilizer left a lot of fuzz and thin layers of the material during the first go-round.

I put Aleene’s STOP Fraying around the tissue opening and let it dry. I covered the tissue box first. I wasn’t worried about the fabric not fitting tightly because the next layer would hide it.

For the ‘bottom’ piece, I ironed the ‘side’ flaps over and glued them with Aleene’s Fast Grab Tacky Glue. Then I put a ribbon around the shape and folded the outer flaps down over the ribbon and glued them down.

I pulled the ribbon tight and placed the tissue box inside it. By laying the box on its side I was able to pull the ribbon and fasten it in place without fighting over the longer side panels.

I placed another ribbon around the outside and tied the bow. Then, using steam from my iron I shaped the side panels so they’d puff out.

And voila!

Materials:

  • box of tissues
  • 18″ x 24″ fabric (two matching patterns)
  • matching ribbon
  • Pellon heavyweight fusible stabilizer
  • Aleene’s STOP Fraying
  • Aleene’s Fast Grab Tacky Glue
  • Fabric Blade (yellow cap)

Settings (Maxx Air):

  • f = 74
  • v = 200
  • p = 2

Steps:

  1. Iron the stabilizer to the fabric.
  2. Create or open the cut file.
  3. Using a sticky mat, brayer the fabric down so it is completely stuck to the mat.
  4. Cut the shapes from the stabilizer/fabric.
  5. Apply STOP Fraying to the tissue opening.
  6. Press flaps and folds with an iron.
  7. Cover the tissue box with the first layer and glue pieces together at the flaps.
  8. On the outer fabric cut, glue down the side flaps first.
  9. Insert a ribbon in the outer folds, and glue them down as well.
  10. Fold up the tissue box cover and pull the ribbon.
  11. Insert the tissue box, pull the ribbon tight and tie it.
  12. Tie another ribbon around the top rim of the tissue box.
  13. Use steam from the iron to shape the sides. Apply steam to each side, then set it upright to cool.

I wish I had some springtime fabric to cover all of our tissue boxes!

Stencils from vinyl for an easy peasy Le Boudoir wood plaque

Spring Break is over, boo hoo. I don’t feel like I even got a break. Why not? Because my dear husband volunteered to paint my mom’s house and even though I only spent 4 days over there during break I feel like I had zero time for myself for the entire holiday. Well, until today when I finally got to finish my stencil project.

Mom selected a dark pinkish red for her master bedroom, and it is a much bolder look than I would have expected from her. My mom is in Florida for the winter so she hasn’t even seen it yet. I jokingly told her that she wasn’t allowed to call it her bedroom – it is now the boudoir.

I used Harrington font and created the border from a variety of basic shapes that I skewed and welded together. Next I traced the chandelier from a free image and voila!

Materials:

Settings for vinyl (Maxx Air):

  • f = 28
  • v = 300
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Create your design in your favorite software
  2. Cut the vinyl and weed the waste
  3. Use transfer tape to pick up the design and transfer to the wood plaque   vinyl stencil
  4. Use a squeegee to adhere the vinyl to the wood, remove the transfer tape  
  5. Paint as desired   stencil peeled off
  6. Remove stencil vinyl  
  7. Fill in with color or simply cover with the Matte coating   stencil area filled in with color
    The copic marker spreads by just touching the wood and fills in the color. The painted area keeps it locked in. I coated the entire plaque with matte coating.

I’m going to mount it over the bedroom door before she gets home from Florida – tee hee hee. lol

ThermoFlex Extra for heat sensitive materials

I received this adorable free bag with a purchase, and at first did not have a clue what to do with it. It is a synthetic leather, so I had some concerns. I looked up the instructions for the KNK heat transfer vinyl and found that ThermoFlex Extra works with heat sensitive materials.

Free Pink Bag

Free Pink Bag

I needed a bag to carry my dog supplies when we traveled to a meeting or a show. This is a nice roomy bag and would work well for carrying blankets as well as their water and food bowls.

I used a combination of old designs to create a personalized bag.

Decorated pink bag

Decorated pink bag

I had so much fun with it, I found another bag on clearance and decorated it to carry their brushes, paperwork and treats.

This bag has soft leather trim. I put a textbook inside it to iron the sections between the trim, then ironed the lettering onto the trim.

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air):

  • f = 24
  • v = 175
  • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Open or create your design in the software.
  2. Reverse the design.
  3. Cut using the appropriate settings.
  4. Use a heat press or iron to transfer the vinyl to the bag following the instructions from TeamKNK.

I think I need ThermoFlex Extra in every color now!!!

Heat Transfer on Heat Sensitive Materials?

Have you ever worried about melting or damaging a shirt, bag or other material when applying a heat transfer vinyl? I know I have – probably because I’ve melted an item or two in my crafting endeavors (okay, maybe more than that, but I’m not counting).

ThermoFlex Extra is THE solution to personalization with heat sensitive materials. It is available in 15 great colors:

Twelve of these colors can be layered for additional design options!

ThermoFlex Extra only needs to be pressed for short time periods at 310-315 degrees Fahrenheit on nylon, synthetic leather, leather and other materials. This means you can personalize those materials that were previously untouchable by any kind of heat activated product!

Each material should be tested first.

  • Prepress for 5 seconds (optional, test first)
  • Press for 3-5 seconds
  • Let cool and peel the backing off
  • Cover with a teflon sheet
  • Repress for 10 seconds

Using these steps you can press to nylon, synthetic leather, leather and many more heat sensitive materials. For polyester, press at 330-335 degrees Fahrenheit for 17-20 seconds (ThermoFlex Plus instructions).

As with most heat transfer vinyls, the standard (red cap) blade is recommended. This HTV comes on a thick plastic carrier that makes it easy to cut and weed.

Cut the design in reverse (mirror image).

When applying to a water resistant or moisture-wicking material, clean the area with rubbing alcohol and allow it to dry before pressing the HTV onto it.

Note from the manufacturer: Dye migration has occurred with low energy dyes in polyester and poly-bled fabrics.

Stop back on Monday to see my projects using ThermoFlex Extra!

50th Celebration Tile

Oh, what a day!

Have you ever had one of those days when it seems like nothing goes right? You just can’t get things to work they way you thought they would? Well, I’m having one of those. I had a project on the back burner just waiting for a play date with the Force. First I couldn’t find my rotary tool collets or drill bits – well, I haven’t used them since the last KNK Retreat so I can’t even remember what I might have done with them. Okay, scratch that project. Next, I wanted to make a stencil to screen print a t-shirt for my daughter and I darned if I can remember where the screens are. Now, those I haven’t seen for a year so they could be anywhere!

Then I decided to try out some thermo-fusible adhesive and that project totally bombed, I can’t even show you because I threw it out with the trash. 🙂 It’s okay though because I learned several things not to do and a few things that I can do!

Next I took a break and ate the yummy steak my husband grilled for me in the frigid 9 degree Fahrenheit weather.

Okay, back to work.

All in all, my KNK machines work perfect and they are the only reason I was able to complete the next project on my list!

I pulled a free shared image off the web and pixel traced it in Make-the-Cut, then I cut it out of vinyl for a stencil, and double side adhesive for foil.

img_20170108_191909421_opt

Materials:

Settings (Maxx Air):

  • Vinyl
    • f = 24
    • v = 250
    • p = 1
  • Double sided adhesive
    • f = 52
    • v = 250
    • p = 1

Steps:

  1. Create or open the design in MTC
  2. Cut the file from vinyl and double sided adhesive using the listed settings (I cut one corner square so that it would line up with my tile easily) stencil
  3. Apply the vinyl stencil and ink the tile
  4. Carefully remove the vinyl and heat set the ink (I forgot to take a pic with the vinyl on the tile except for the little pieces I circled) heat set ink
  5. Apply the double sided adhesive and remove the non-stick liner   double sided adhesive
  6. Apply the foil, press on well (don’t do what I did and scratch the surface with the squeegee)  foil
  7. Remove the file and put it on display (on your KNP3D printed easel)  finished project

Glass tiles are fun to use and I like how the surface image casts a shadow.

Whew, I think I need to rest now. Hope you enjoyed today’s project from Team KNK!