About laurie nash

Laurie Nash is a retired Occupational Therapy Assistant. She is also a wife, mother, grandmother, and lover of arts, crafts, and design. She uses Inkscape and Make the Cut for designing. Her KNK Zing keeps her busy cutting, and she is now the proud owner the new KNK Force.

Craft Room Remodel – Adding a Personal Touch

Photo of Craft Room RemodelIt’s cold in the north… very cold! But that’s okay because I’m updating my studio, and this craft room remodel is keeping me busy in my cozy, happy space. I’ve spent the past couple months organizing, sorting, adding in new furniture, and decorating my space. I painted the walls bright white, and Hubby helped me add lights, lights, and more lights.Photo of Ikea Alex Drawers - Craft Remodel

All of the new furniture I added to my room is from Ikea. I am in love with Ikea Kallax and Alex units; they are minimalistic, sturdy, and functional. (If you want to see more about my craft room remodel, you can take a look here.) They also make a perfect canvas for a little personalization with vinyl.

Next to my work desk resides my Zing Orbit (or original Zing) on top of one of the Alex six-drawer units. This sits out in my room in such a way that the back of the drawer unit shows. This large, smooth white surface was begging for some vinyl… and I was happy to oblige.

Photo of Alex Drawers with Create Joy Vinyl for Craftroom RemodelI used my “Create Joy” file with black for the outlines and gold for the fill. It turned out well, but I thought it still needed something. So, I used Inkscape’s inset command (I usually design in Inkscape, but you could use MTC or SCAL for the inset) to cut a yellow piece slightly smaller than the gold. Close-up of Vinyl EmbellishmentThe gold gives a little extra bling around the yellow.

After decorating the back of the drawer unit, I decided the face of the drawers needed a little love. If you’d like the SVG (no font included) click here.Photo of Alex Drawers with Numbers

Next, on to the sewing area for a little flower embellishment on my Ikea Finthorp” condiment and utensil” buckets.

And finally, tiny squiggles on my not for cosmetics… “cosmetic organizer”.

Photo of small desk top organizer drawers

 

 

 

Materials:

Intermediate Vinyl

Transfer Tape

Red Capped Blade

Settings for KNK Zing and MTC:

Force – 25

Multicut – 1

Speed – 11

 

Handmade Napkins Decorated with Heat Transfer Vinyl

Photo of Handmade Napkins Heat Transfer VinylSometimes it’s nice to have a set of cloth napkins. No need to save them for special occasions; they are fun for everyday use. A lightweight cotton fabric works great, and can be quickly cut and hemmed. Make these handmade napkins decorated with heat transfer vinyl.

I used this tutorial, written by Theresa on the Spoonflower blog for tips on sewing the napkins. I really like the way she explains her mitered corner method. It reduces bulk at the corners and provides a nice finished look.

I cut my napkins from 34 inch wide fabric, which enabled me to create 4 from a yard. I cut 4 squares at 17 inches and kept the hems fairly small to give me finished napkins that are about 16 inches square. (Of course, you can simply purchase blank napkins and add the HTV, but making them is more fun!)

Materials:

Settings on Zing:

  • Force – 25
  • Speed – 10
  • Multicut – 1 or 2

Steps:

  • Cut and sew napkins as described above.
  • Import file in cutting software. Don’t forget to mirror design to prepare for HTV application.
  • Cut and weed heat transfer vinyl.
  • Use iron or heat press to apply heat transfer vinyl to napkin, according to manufacturers instructions.

Enjoy your new napkins or give to a friend!Handmade Napkins Decorated with Heat Transfer Vinyl

 

 

 

 

Print and Cut Stickers

Photo of Red Cabin Studio StickersI wrap some of the items sold at my craft shows and online in tissue paper. Sometimes I tie them up in a ribbon, but stickers would be so much easier. Here are a few print and cut stickers I created with my logo.  And…. I made some dog and kitten ones for a special lilttle princess.Print and Cut Sticker with Basset Hound Sticker on Envelope

 

 

 

 

 

Materials

Glossy Inkjet Vinyl Sticker Sheets

KNK Mat

Red Capped Blade

Image File

Zing Orbit Settings

Speed – 15

Pressure – 50 (depending on thickness of your vinyl)

Multi-Cut  –  off

Red Cabin Studio Stick on Box

When choosing an image for your stickers, be sure to use one saved at a high quality (300 dpi). I traced my image in Sure Cuts Alot and then completed a path offset on the cut layer.  (For the round stickers, I used path inset so that it cut just inside the printed circle, because I didn’t want the black line to show.

Next, I printed the page of images with the registration marks. I chose glossy photo paper in my printer software and printed at a high quality.

When preparing for scanning the registration marks, it’s important to adhere your vinyl to a sturdy mat such as the one that comes with the Zing Orbit. While this type of mat will keep your project nice and flat, a thinner mat may not be sufficiently flat to allow for a successful scan. (I learned this the hard way.)

Have some fun with this project. There are different sticker paper/vinyl options to try out. While I have used a matte sticker paper in the past, I prefer the glossy vinyl… but that is just my preference. Experiment with the offset and inset options. Try putting a shape around your image like I did with my circle logo stickers. If you need help with any of the print and cut steps, be sure to refer to your software manual. It takes some practice… but it is worth the time spent when you end up with a fun and functional product like print and cut stickers!

 

3D Thanksgiving Card – 3D Card with KNK Zing – Card with Acetate Window

3D Thanksgiving CardI make floating Christmas ornaments to sell in craft shows and through a local shop. To make the inside, I adhere a vinyl design to a piece of acetate (overhead transparency). I decided it would be fun to make a greeting card using the same process. This time though, I used 3 sheets of transparency and placed portions of the design on each. By creating it in this way, it gave it a 3D effect.

Materials:

  1. Intermediate Vinyl
  2. Mylar, acetate, or other transparent plastic sheet
  3. White Cardstock
  4. Scrapbook Tape
  5. 3M (or similar) foam tape
  6. Red Capped Blade
  7. Zing Orbit

Machine Settings for Zing Orbit and Scal:

  1. Cutting Card stock: Pressure – 56, Speed – 12, Multi-Cut – 2
  2. Cutting Vinyl – Pressure – 50, Speed – 16, Multi-Cut – Off
  3. Cutting Transparency – I cut this on my original Zing with MTC: Force 120, Speed 11, Multi-cut – 3

Steps:

  1. If you want to have something printed on the card, do that first. If you plan to use PNC, make sure to print your registration marks. Of course, it would be fine to simply cut by hand as well.
  2. Cut the card stock window panes. For this I first cut a 5″ X 7″ rectangle, then 4 smaller rectangles from that.
  3. Cut 3 pieces of transparency. You’ll need them to be just a little smaller than your card size, but big enough so the edges will be under the window frame. Leave enough room along the edge for scrapbook tape to stick to the edges. (See
  4. Cut out the vinyl for your design. Decide which portions need to be in the background, and which in the foreground.
  5. Adhere vinyl to transparencies. Stack them carefully on the card, and on each 3D Thanksgiving Cardother, as you build your design so that you are lining things up properly.
  6. Use small pieces of foam tape between transparencies, hidden under the vinyl, to build up the design and hold it together.
  7. Stick the double-sided tape to the backside outer edges of the window frame. Carefully adhere to your card, being sure to line up carefully. If you have cut your transparencies small enough, this should hold all pieces together.

I am pretty happy with how this turned out. It might be easier next time to cut the window panes out of the front of the card. This way I could place the transparencies behind the cut-out. I would then need to line the card (or just the back side of the card front) to enclose the layers.

Flour Sack Towel with Heat Transfer Vinyl – Zing Orbit with Sure Cuts Alot

Flour Sack Towel  Heat Transfer Towel Our little town does not have much to offer visitors. So when I saw that our local fish market had expanded and started selling items highlighting our area, I asked them if they’d like me to make up a few things for them to offer. I had made this file into a shirt for my husband last year using an inkjet transfer. I decided it would do well on a flour sack towel with a few changes. This time I used Heat Transfer Vinyl.

I recently purchased a KNK Zing Orbit and am now using Sure Cuts Alot. Being accustomed to Make The Cut, there has been a small learning curve, but for basic cutting I was able to get right at it with no problems.

Materials:

  1. ThermoFlex Plus
  2. Flour sack Towel (I purchased mine at Walmart)
  3. Red-Capped Blade
  4. Iron or Heatpress

Settings on Zing Orbit with SCAL:

  1. Pressure: 50
  2. Speed: 15
  3. Overcut: 1mm
  4. Multi-cut: Off

Steps:

  1. Open or import file in SCAL
  2. Reverse design
  3. Cut design and weed
  4. Set heat press at 335 degrees and press for 17 minutes (for hand iron, refer to manufacturer’s instructions)
  5. Fold towel in half and crease mid-point using iron or heat press
  6. Lay towel flat and use crease to place center HTV
  7. Press vinyl onto towel (Use teflon sheet or towel between iron and vinyl)
  8. Remove clear backing and repeat

I am having fun getting to know my Zing Orbit. So far, one of my favorite features on the Orbit is the ability to adjust the pinch wheels. The ability to move them close enough to cut small pieces of vinyl without using a mat saves me a lot of time, and I find myself using the feature a lot.