Etch a Ceramic Jar with Armour Etch – Color it with Gilders Wax

I have done etching on glass a few times, but wanted to see how it would work on ceramic. A few of these cute little ceramic jars have been sitting in my craft room since I found them on clearance a few years ago. The nice smooth surface provided just the canvas I needed to try out this project.

Material:

  1. Ceramic Jar
  2. Armour Etch Cream
  3. Gilders Paste Wax
  4. Vinyl for Stencil
  5. Transfer Tape
  6. Paint Brush
  7. Protective clothing, such as rubber gloves, goggles, apron
  8. Red Capped Blade

Setting for KNK Zing:

  1. Force – 18
  2. Speed – 10
  3. Multicut – 1

Steps:

  1. Open or download design in cutter software.
  2. Load vinyl and cut stencil.
  3. Weed vinyl stencil.
  4. Apply transfer tape to vinyl, remove backing, and apply stencil to ceramic surface.
  5. Remove transfer tape.
  6. Use paint brush to apply etching cream liberally, being careful not to extend the cream beyond the edge of your stencil.
  7. Leave the cream on a few minutes. I left mine on about 3 minutes.
  8. Clean off thoroughly under running water.
  9. Peel off stencil and dry completely.the
  10. Use a rag to apply Gilders Wax to etched surface. Continue rubbing to remove from non-etched area. (The wax sets quickly, so I had best luck by removing excess wax as soon as possible. It can be removed later, but takes a lot more effort.)

    I left the stencil in place while applying some of the wax, but it is not necessary.

I realized after I started the project that it was not a good idea to plan a two-color project where the two colors were directly adjacent to each other. It was very difficult to apply the end of the “green” stem within the red cherry portion of the design,

I also attempted this on a ceramic tile. It worked, but I wasn’t happy with the end result. The entire tile apparently was a little porous as I was not able to completely remove the excess wax from the surface of the tile. This might be remedied by leaving the stencil in place while applying the Gilders Wax. I may have to give it another try.

 

 

Custom Switch Cover

When we bought our house 2 years ago we went looking at the Habitat for Humanity Restore store for odds and ends around the house.   We came across these screwless light switch covers.  While looking at them I thought about decorating them with vinyl, like I do with most things.                                                             

Materials

Settings

  • Force:  15
  • Passes:  1
  • Speed:  10/10
  • Offset:  .25

 

  1. Make template of the light switch in the design software of your choice.  I used MTC.
  2. Design what you want on the light switch.  I went with a willow tree and welcome since it is by my front door.
  3. Cut out the vinyl in the color of your choice
  4. Prepare the light switch cover by cleaning off with rubbing alcohol                 
  5. Carefully line up the vinyl and the cover and voila you have a custom light switch cover.                                                                    

I have also put vinyl on outlet covers for my daughter’s room.  They have held up so well I plan to do it for my son’s room.                                             

You’re tea-rrific Mom

Hope you all wished your Moms a Happy Mother’s Day. This was the card I made mine. I found a cute teacup svg silhouette online and traced it and easily duplicated and mirrored it into a card.

You know I love that svg love website, so I downloaded a cute little saying for the inside. I could’ve easily done a print and cut, but I was lazy, so I just printed it out in my laser printer and glued it on the inside.

I decorated the outside of the card with some sizzix die cuts I have. It’s funny that I have a machine that can create anything my brain can come up with (and that I have a drawing for) and yet I have sizzix dies… which take up space… and are only one size.

Machine Used: KNK Zing, red blade

Materials

DCWV paper

sizzix dies (Tim Holriz tattered dies and letters)

embossing folder: swiss dots

 

I guess I’m in a rut with all my shaped cards… and that’s probably what I’m going to show you next month as well.

Until next time,

stay classy KNKers! 🙂

Use HTV to Create Matching Shirts for a Little Girl and Her 18 Inch Doll

Since we have 4 granddaughters, we are pretty familiar with the 18 inch dolls that are so popular. I decided it would be fun to make matching shirts using HTV, for a special little girl and her doll.

Materials:

  1. Child’s T-Shirt
  2. Doll T-Shirt – Look here for the ones I purchased.
  3. ThermoFlex Plus
  4. GlitterFlex II
  5. Red Capped Blade
  6. Heat Press
  7. Teflon sheet

Settings for KNK Zing:

  1. Speed 10
  2. Force for GlitterFlex II – 45
  3. Force for ThermoFlex Ultra – 20
  4. MultiCut – 1 or 2

Steps:

  1. Import or open design in your cutting software.
  2. Measure the areas that you will be placing your designs on, and be certain you size the designs appropriately for each shirt.
  3. Make sure you reverse your design before you cut.
  4. Check design to make sure it is ready to cut. If there are extra nodes or line segments, now is a good time to use your node editing tool to clean things up. This will give you a better cut. (The arrow below is indicating an extra line segment that needs to be deleted.)
  5. Lay out your cut designs on each shirt to check for placement. Lay the doll shirt in your heat press. The doll shirts I purchased have a Velcro closure in the back. I opened this up so that I could lay the shirt flat. I laid it near the corner of my heat press in such a way as to get good pressure where it was needed. Place your design on the shirt, vinyl side down. Cover with Teflon sheet.
  6. It’s important to follow the manufacturers instructions for temperature and time, so check that out before proceeding. KNKusa.com has that information on their website.
  7. After completing the doll shirt, you are ready to follow the same steps for the girl’s shirt.
  8. Now…. surprise a little girl in your life with this sweet gift for her and her 18 inch doll.

 

 

 

 

Need a Special Longarm Ruler? No Problem!

I am working on a special quilted art piece using new materials and techniques that I am currently experimenting with. Leather, heat transfer vinyl, computerized cutting, and chainmail! Each of the blocks in the quilt have different styles of background quilting for the theme of the block. I wanted a gentle wave as background fill for the House Stark block and could not find a longarm ruler exactly like I needed, so I decided to make one using my Maxx Air.

Longarm rulers need to be ¼” thick so the hopping foot does not jump the ruler and cause damage to the needle bar and throw off the machine timing. Not to mention break needles! Since we cannot cut that thickness of material with our cutting machines, I decided to cut multiple layers of craft plastic and glue the layers together to get to the ¼” height I needed. It took ten layers of the .020mm plastic to achieve the proper thickness.

Materials

Grafix Craft Plastic .020 mm

KNK Zing/Zing Air/Maxx Air Standard Material Detail Blade

KNK Zing/Zing Air 12″ x 12″ Extra Sticky Mat Set (Green Grid)

Engraving Tool

Clear adhesive for plastics

 

Maxx Air Settings

Engrave Settings

Engraving Tool, Force = 120, Speed = 400, Passes = 3, Blade Offset = 0,

Blade Height = 25

Cut Layer Settings

Red Blade, Force = 190, Speed = 300, Passes = 3, Blade Offset = .25, Blade Height = 25

Process Details

Brought my Corel design for the ruler into Make the Cut! and added the text for the ruler name. Separated the text and guide lines as separate layers for the engraving. I only engraved one text layer and a few guidelines only layers, the rest I just cut the outline of the ruler.

I could get three ruler layers on one sheet of 12” x12” craft plastic. Using the Extra Sticky Mat, I taped down the edges of the plastic, just in case. First, I engraved the plastic using the Engraving Tool with the ruler name and then changed to the Red Blade to cut the ruler layers.

After removing the excess plastic, I glued the layers together carefully making sure that everything lined up properly. I encased the engraved layers between the clear layers so I got a smooth bottom to my ruler. And for a little extra bit of security I used a clear packing tape on the ends while the glue was drying.

I then applied a few pieces of ruler grip tape to the bottom so the ruler would not slip on the surface of the leather as I was quilting. I did notice some minor “fanning” of the layers when the hopping foot was in motion, but not enough to impact the outcome. Next time I will be sure to apply more glue along the edges.

I am pleased with the results using my new longarm ruler. This was a quick solution to fulfill my need and I will be making more longarm rulers for special projects in the future!